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Domestication

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CARTA:Domestication and Human Evolution - Robert Franciscus: Craniofacial Feminization in Evolution

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Where Do Domestic Cats Come From?

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CARTA: Domestication: Transformation of Wolf to Dog; Fox Domestication; Craniofacial Feminization

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A brief history of dogs - David Ian Howe

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Evolution Toward a 'Cultured Meat': The Domestication of Cell Culture

Domestication is a sustained multi-generational relationship in which one group of organisms assumes a significant degree of influence over the reproduction and care of another group to secure a more predictable supply of resources from that second group. Charles Darwin recognized the small number of traits that made domestic species different from their wild ancestors. He was also the first to recognize the difference between conscious selective breeding in which humans directly select for desirable traits, and unconscious selection where traits evolve as a by-product of natural selection or from selection on other traits. There is a genetic difference between domestic and wild populations. There is also such a difference between the domestication traits that researchers believe to have been essential at the early stages of domestication, and the improvement traits that have appeared since the split between wild and domestic populations. Domestication traits are generally fixed within all domesticates, and were selected during the initial episode of domestication of that animal or plant, whereas improvement traits are present only in a proportion of domesticates, though they may be fixed in individual breeds or regional populations.