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Homing endonuclease

3:45

Meganucleases

2:17

Genome Editing with engineered nucleases

2:59

Search for Specific Exon from Sequence | Genome Engineering Using CRISPR | Lecture 24

3:00

Creation of Sequence Specific Nuclease using TALENS | Genome Engineering Using CRISPR | Lecture 13

2:52

GROUP II INTRONS

The homing endonucleases are a collection of endonucleases encoded either as freestanding genes within introns, as fusions with host proteins, or as self-splicing inteins. They catalyze the hydrolysis of genomic DNA within the cells that synthesize them, but do so at very few, or even singular, locations. Repair of the hydrolyzed DNA by the host cell frequently results in the gene encoding the homing endonuclease having been copied into the cleavage site, hence the term 'homing' to describe the movement of these genes. Homing endonucleases can thereby transmit their genes horizontally within a host population, increasing their allele frequency at greater than Mendelian rates.
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    • Origin and mechanism 

    • Nomenclature 

    • Comparison to restriction enzymes 

    • Structural families 

    • Domain architecture