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John C. Calhoun

Biography

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John C. Calhoun

 

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John C Calhoun Slavery a Positive Good

 

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Calhoun's Prophecy.wmv

 

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Crews Remove S.C. Statue Of Former Vice President John C. Calhoun | NBC News NOW

 

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Amistad Senator Calhoun from South Carolina attacks President Van Buren become

John Caldwell Calhoun was an American statesman and political theorist from South Carolina who served as the seventh vice president of the United States from 1825 to 1832. He is remembered for strongly defending slavery and for advancing the concept of minority rights in politics, which he did in the context of protecting the interests of the white South when it was outnumbered by Northerners. He began his political career as a nationalist, modernizer, and proponent of a strong national government and protective tariffs. In the late 1820s, his views changed radically and he became a leading proponent of states' rights, limited government, nullification, and opposition to high tariffs—he saw Northern acceptance of these policies as the only way to keep the South in the Union. His beliefs and warnings heavily influenced the South's secession from the Union in 1860–1861.
  • Personal 

  • War of 1812 

  • Postwar planning 

  • Rhetorical style 

  • Secretary of War and postwar nationalism 

  • 1824 and 1828 elections and Adams presidency 

  • Petticoat affair 

  • Nullification 

  • Resignation 

  • First term in the U.S. Senate 

  • Appointment and the Annexation of Texas 

  • Election of 1844 

  • Mexican–American War and Wilmot Proviso 

  • Oregon boundary dispute 

  • Rejection of the Compromise of 1850 

  • Death, last words, and burial 

  • Agrarian republicanism 

  • Slavery 

  • Opposition to the War with Mexico 

  • Concurrent majority 

  • State sovereignty and the "Calhoun Doctrine" 

  • Monuments and memorials 

  • Film and television 

  • Historical reputation