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Speed of light

12:46

The Speed of Light is NOT About Light

5:46

Maxwell's Equations and the Speed of Light | Doc Physics

4:52

Flat Earth -Dirty secrets of science! Speed of light, the big G, Universal constants???

3:14

Why is the Speed of Light Constant?

59:36

Before the Big Bang 8: Varying Speed Of Light Cosmology (VSL)

The speed of light in vacuum, commonly denoted c, is a universal physical constant important in many areas of physics. Its exact value is 299,792,458 metres per second. It is exact because by international agreement a metre is defined to be the length of the path travelled by light in vacuum during a time interval of 1/299792458 second. According to special relativity, c is the maximum speed at which all conventional matter and hence all known forms of information in the universe can travel. Though this speed is most commonly associated with light, it is in fact the speed at which all massless particles and changes of the associated fields travel in vacuum. Such particles and waves travel at c regardless of the motion of the source or the inertial reference frame of the observer. In the special and general theories of relativity, c interrelates space and time, and also appears in the famous equation of mass–energy equivalence E = mc2.
  • Types 

  • Numerical value, notation, and units 

  • Faster-than-light observations and experiments 

  • Propagation of light 

  • Practical effects of finiteness 

  • Measurement 

  • History