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10th Battalion

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10th Battalion H.L.I. Crossing the Rhine & Ballochoyle

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Red Army choir - Our tenth amphibious battalion (with English subs)

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10th Battalion HLI Crossing the Rhine, for Jack

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10th Battalion H.L.I. Crossing the Rhine, Garryowen

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10th Battalion County Of London Regiment Headquarters (1914-1918)

The 10th Battalion was an infantry battalion of the Australian Army that served as part of the Australian Imperial Force during World War I. Among the first units raised in Australia during the war, the battalion was recruited from South Australia in August 1914 and along with the 9th, 11th and 12th Battalions, it formed part of the 3rd Brigade, 1st Division. After its personnel completed basic training, the battalion embarked for the Middle East, where further training was undertaken in Egypt before the battalion was committed to the Gallipoli Campaign. On 25 April 1915, the 10th Battalion took part in the Landing at Anzac Cove, coming ashore during the initial stages of the operation as part of the covering force. Members from the 10th Battalion penetrated the furthest inland of any Australian troops during the initial fighting, before the Allied advance inland was checked. After this, the battalion helped defend the beachhead against a Turkish counter-attack in May, before joining the August Offensive, a failed Allied effort to break the deadlock. Casualties were heavy throughout the campaign and in November 1915, the surviving members were withdrawn from the peninsula and in early 1916 the battalion was reformed in Egypt. After a period of reorganisation, during which the 10th provided a cadre staff to the newly formed 50th Battalion, it was transferred to the Western Front in March 1916, and for the next two-and-a-half years took part in trench warfare in France and Belgium until the Armistice in 1918. The last detachment of men from the 10th Battalion returned to Australia in September 1919.
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