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1877 St. Louis general strike

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Commemoration of 1877 General Strike in the St. Louis Region - Part 1

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Commemoration of 1877 General Strike in the St. Louis Region - Part 2

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Commemoration of 1877 General Strike in the St. Louis Region - Part 12

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Commemoration of 1877 General Strike in the St. Louis Region - Part 6

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Commemoration of 1877 General Strike in the St. Louis Region - Part 10

Generally accepted as the first general strike in the United States, the 1877 St. Louis general strike grew out of the Great Railroad Strike of 1877. The general strike was largely organized by the Knights of Labor and the Marxist-leaning Workingmen's Party, the main radical political party of the era. When the railroad strike reached East St. Louis, Illinois in July 1877, the St. Louis Workingman's Party led a group of approximately 500 people across the river in an act of solidarity with the nearly 1,000 workers on strike. The party transformed, through speeches and organization, an initial strike among railroad workers into a strike by thousands of workers in several industries for the eight-hour day and a ban on child labor. One speaker was noted to say, All you have to do, gentlemen, for you have the numbers, is to unite on one idea - that workingmen shall rule the country. What man makes, belongs to him, and the workingmen made this country.
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