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Augustinian theodicy

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The Augustinian Theodicy (Extract from "The Problem of Evil")

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The Problem of Evil 2 - St Augustine's Theodicy

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St Augustine’s Theodicy

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Is Augustine's Theodicy Relevant for Modern Society?

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The Problem Of Evil: Augustine's theodicy - Revision Video

The Augustinian theodicy, named for the 4th- and 5th-century theologian, philosopher and Saint Augustine of Hippo, is a type of Christian theodicy designed in response to the evidential problem of evil. As such, it attempts to explain the probability of an omnipotent (all-powerful) and omnibenevolent (all-good) God amid evidence of evil in the world. A number of variations of this kind of theodicy have been proposed throughout history; their similarities were first described by the 20th-century philosopher John Hick, who classified them as "Augustinian". They typically assert that God is perfectly (ideally) good; that he created the world out of nothing; and that evil is the result of humanity's original sin. The entry of evil into the world is generally explained as punishment for sin and its continued presence due to humans' misuse of free will. God's goodness and benevolence, according to the Augustinian theodicy, remain perfect and without responsibility for evil or suffering.
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