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Austenite

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Unique properties of NiTi alloys

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Materials - Ferrous - Austenite to Ferrite Phase Transformation

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Why is the carbon solubility so different in ferrite vs austenite?

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What is AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL? What does AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL mean?

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Austenite, also known as gamma-phase iron (γ-Fe), is a metallic, non-magnetic allotrope of iron or a solid solution of iron, with an alloying element. In plain-carbon steel, austenite exists above the critical eutectoid temperature of 1000 K (727°C); other alloys of steel have different eutectoid temperatures. The austenite allotrope exists at room temperature in stainless steel. It is named after Sir William Chandler Roberts-Austen (1843–1902).
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    • Allotrope of iron 

    • Material 

    • Austempering 

    • Behavior in plain carbon-steel 

    • Behavior in cast iron 

    • Stabilization 

    • Thermo-optical emission