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1974 aluminium cent

7:02

1974 Aluminum Lincoln Cent Worth $2,000,000 But It Is Illegal To Own

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Discovery 1974-D Aluminum Lincoln Cent on Display at Long Beach Expo. VIDEO: 4:26.

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CoinWeek: 1974-D Aluminum Cent - 4K Video

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Rare & Valuable $2,000,000 1974 D Aluminum Lincoln Cents Are Still In Circulation Today! Penny

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Do You Have A 1974 D Lincoln Cent Penny Illegal To Own Worth $250,000??

The 1974 aluminum cent was a one-cent coin proposed by the United States Mint in 1973. It was composed of an alloy of aluminum and trace metals, and intended to replace the predominantly copper–zinc cent due to the rising costs of coin production in the traditional bronze alloy. 1,571,167 were struck in anticipation of release, but none were released into circulation. Examples were passed out to US Congressmen in a bid to win favor in switching to the new alloy. When the proposed aluminum cent was rejected, the Mint recalled and destroyed the examples. A few aluminum cents not returned to the Mint are believed to remain in existence. One example was donated to the Smithsonian Institution, while another was alleged to have been found by a US Capitol Police Officer. A 1974-D specimen was found in January 2014 by Randall Lawrence, who said it was a retirement gift to his father, who worked at the Mint in Denver. Randall planned on selling it in a public auction, but the Mint demanded its return, saying that the coin was never authorized for release and therefore remains U.S. Government property. Lawrence ultimately surrendered the coin when the Mint showed that the aluminum penny had never been authorized to be struck in Denver, and there was no evidence that the coin had been a gift of any kind.
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    • History 

    • Toven Specimen 

    • Lawrence Specimen 

    • Other examples