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Charles Lindbergh

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Charles Lindbergh Biography 1

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The Charles Lindbergh Story - Full Length Documentary - 3688

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History Brief: Charles Lindbergh and the Spirit of St. Louis

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Lindbergh's Journey

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Charles Lindbergh and the Rise of 1940s Nazi Sympathizers

Charles Augustus Lindbergh, nicknamed Lucky Lindy, The Lone Eagle, and Slim was an American aviator, military officer, author, inventor, explorer, and environmental activist. At age 25 in 1927, he went from obscurity as a U.S. Air Mail pilot to instantaneous world fame by winning the Orteig Prize: making a nonstop flight from Roosevelt Field, Long Island, New York, to Paris, France. Lindbergh covered the ​33 1⁄2-hour, 3,600 statute miles (5,800 km) alone in a single-engine purpose-built Ryan monoplane, Spirit of St. Louis. This was not the first flight between North America and Europe, but he did achieve the first solo transatlantic flight and the first non-stop flight between North America and the European mainland. Lindbergh was an officer in the U.S. Army Air Corps Reserve, and he received the United States' highest military decoration, the Medal of Honor, for the feat.