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Combustion

2:06

What is combustion?

3:56

Combustion & Incomplete Combustion | Environmental Chemistry | FuseSchool

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TRAILER-COMBUSTION

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Combustion Chemistry Demonstration

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Complete & Incomplete Combustion | Environmental Chemistry | Chemistry | FuseSchool

Combustion, or burning, is a high-temperature exothermic redox chemical reaction between a fuel (the reductant) and an oxidant, usually atmospheric oxygen, that produces oxidized, often gaseous products, in a mixture termed as smoke. Combustion in a fire produces a flame, and the heat produced can make combustion self-sustaining. Combustion is often a complicated sequence of elementary radical reactions. Solid fuels, such as wood and coal, first undergo endothermic pyrolysis to produce gaseous fuels whose combustion then supplies the heat required to produce more of them. Combustion is often hot enough that incandescent light in the form of either glowing or a flame is produced. A simple example can be seen in the combustion of hydrogen and oxygen into water vapor, a reaction commonly used to fuel rocket engines. This reaction releases 242 kJ/mol of heat and reduces the enthalpy accordingly (at constant temperature and pressure):2H2(g) + O2(g) → 2 H2O(g)