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Ice hockey arenas

Popular in this category (110)

Architecture, Sports

Staples Center

Staples Center, officially stylized as STAPLES Center, is a multi-purpose arena in Downtown Los Angeles. Adjacent to the L.A. Live development, it is located next to the Los Angeles Convention Center complex along Figueroa Street. The arena opened on October 17, 1999, and is one of the major sporting facilities in the Greater Los Angeles Area.

Architecture, Sports

Joe Louis Arena

Joe Louis Arena is a defunct multi-purpose arena in Detroit, Michigan. Completed in 1979 at a cost of $57 million as a replacement for the Detroit Olympia, it sits adjacent to Cobo Center on the bank of the Detroit River and is accessible by the Joe Louis Arena station on the Detroit People Mover. The venue is named after former heavyweight champion boxer Joe Louis, who grew up in Detroit.

Architecture, Sports

Enterprise Center

Enterprise Center is an 18,724-seat arena located in downtown St. Louis, Missouri, United States. Its primary tenant is the St. Louis Blues of the National Hockey League, but it is also used for other functions, such as NCAA basketball, NCAA hockey, concerts, professional wrestling and more. In a typical year, the facility hosts about 175 events. Industry trade publication Pollstar has previously ranked Enterprise Center among the top ten arenas worldwide in tickets sold to non-team events, but the facility has since fallen into the upper sixties, as of 2017.

Architecture, Sports

Bell Centre

The Bell Centre, formerly known as the Molson Centre, is a sports and entertainment complex in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. It opened on March 16, 1996, after nearly three years under construction. It is best known as the home of the National Hockey League's Montreal Canadiens ice hockey team, and it has the largest arena capacity to regularly host an NHL team.

Architecture, Sports

Civic Arena (Pittsburgh)

Civic Arena was an arena located in downtown Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The Civic Arena primarily served as the home to the Pittsburgh Penguins, the city's National Hockey League (NHL) franchise, from 1967 to 2010.

Architecture, Sports

KeyBank Center

KeyBank Center, formerly known as Marine Midland Arena, HSBC Arena and First Niagara Center, is a multipurpose indoor arena located in downtown Buffalo, New York. It is the largest indoor arena in Western New York, seating 19,070 fans in its normal configuration, and was constructed primarily for the Buffalo Sabres of the National Hockey League (NHL), who have called the arena home since 1996, when it replaced the now-demolished Memorial Auditorium. The arena was renamed as KeyBank Center starting with the 2016–2017 NHL season. It is owned by Erie County and operated by Pegula Sports and Entertainment.

Architecture, Sports

UW–Milwaukee Panther Arena

The UW–Milwaukee Panther Arena is an indoor arena located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The arena, which seats as many as 12,700 people and offers 41,000 feet of floor space, is part of a larger downtown campus, that includes the Milwaukee Theatre and Wisconsin Center.

Music, Architecture, Sports

Lanxess Arena

Lanxess Arena is an indoor arena, in Cologne, North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. It is known as the 18,500-capacity home of the Kölner Haie. The arena opened in 1998 and can accommodate 20,000 people for concerts. With its capacity of 18,500, it is the largest ice hockey arena outside North America.

Architecture, Sports

Paramount Fine Foods Centre

The Paramount Fine Foods Centre, formerly the Hershey Centre, is a multi-purpose sports and entertainment complex located in Mississauga, Ontario, Canada. Its current name was adopted on July 1, 2018 following a new naming rights agreement with Mississauga-based restaurant chain Paramount Fine Foods.

Architecture, Sports

Stadio Olimpico Del Ghiaccio

Stadio Olimpico del Ghiaccio was built between 1952 and 1954, primarily as an open air Figure skating arena in Cortina d'Ampezzo, Italy, to hold between seven and eight thousand spectators, with the possibility of making temporary arrangements to accommodate twelve to fifteen thousand for the period of the Olympics. The venue was inaugurated on 26 October 1955. During the 1956 Winter Olympics, the arena held the opening and closing ceremonies, the figure skating events and select ice hockey games. Sometime after 1981, a roof was added to the structure.

Architecture, Sports

FirstOntario Centre

FirstOntario Centre is a sports and entertainment arena on the corner of Bay Street North and York Boulevard in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. The arena, which opened in 1985, has a capacity of up to 19,000.

Architecture, Sports

TD Place Arena

TD Place Arena, originally the Ottawa Civic Centre, is an indoor arena located in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, seating 9,500. With temporary seating and standing room it can hold 10,585. Opened in December 1967, it is used primarily for sports, including curling, figure skating, ice hockey and lacrosse. The arena has hosted Canadian and world championships in figure skating and ice hockey, including the first women's world ice hockey championship in 1990. Canadian championships in curling have also been hosted at the arena. It is also used for concerts and conventions such as Ottawa SuperEX.

Music, Architecture, Sports

Norfolk Scope

Norfolk Scope is a multi-function complex in Norfolk, Virginia, comprising an 11,000-person arena, a 2,500-person theater known as Chrysler Hall, a 10,000 square foot-exhibition hall and a 600-car parking garage.

Architecture, Sports

Maverik Center

The Maverik Center, originally known as the E Center, is a 12,000 seat multi-purpose arena located in West Valley City, Utah, United States. Construction on the arena started in 1996 and was completed in time to hold its first event on September 22, 1997. The arena is owned by West Valley City, and managed by Centennial Management Group, Inc.