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Epidemiologists

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Art, Science, Health

Ronald Ross

Sir Ronald Ross, was a British medical doctor who received the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1902 for his work on the transmission of malaria, becoming the first British Nobel laureate, and the first born outside Europe. His discovery of the malarial parasite in the gastrointestinal tract of a mosquito in 1897 proved that malaria was transmitted by mosquitoes, and laid the foundation for the method of combating the disease. He was a polymath, writing a number of poems, published several novels, and composed songs. He was also an amateur artist and natural mathematician. He worked in the Indian Medical Service for 25 years. It was during his service that he made the groundbreaking medical discovery. After resigning from his service in India, he joined the faculty of Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, and continued as Professor and Chairman of Tropical Medicine of the institute for 10 years. In 1926 he became Director-in-Chief of the Ross Institute and Hospital for Tropical Diseases, which was established in honour of his works. He remained there until his death.

Science, Health

Larry Brilliant

Lawrence "Larry" Brilliant is an American epidemiologist, technologist, philanthropist, and author of "Sometimes Brilliant."

Health

Richard Doll

Sir William Richard Shaboe Doll was a British physician who became an epidemiologist in the mid-20th century and made important contributions to that discipline. He was a pioneer in research linking smoking to health problems. With Ernst Wynder, Bradford Hill and Evarts Graham, he was credited with being the first to prove that smoking caused lung cancer and increased the risk of heart disease. He also carried out pioneering work on the relationship between radiation and leukemia as well as that between asbestos and lung cancer, and alcohol and breast cancer. On 28 June 2012 he was the subject of a series on Radio Four called The New Elizabethans, a programme broadcast to mark the Diamond Jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II, dealing with 60 public figures from her reign.

Health

William Farr

William Farr was a British epidemiologist, regarded as one of the founders of medical statistics.

Health

Joseph Goldberger

Joseph Goldberger was an American physician and epidemiologist in the United States Public Health Service (PHS). As a public health official, he was an advocate for scientific and social recognition of the links between poverty and disease. Furthermore, due to his important work on the link between pellagra and poor diet, he was nominated five times for the Nobel Prize.

Health

Austin Bradford Hill

Sir Austin Bradford Hill FRS, English epidemiologist and statistician, pioneered the randomized clinical trial and, together with Richard Doll, demonstrated the connection between cigarette smoking and lung cancer. Hill is widely known for pioneering the "Bradford Hill" criteria for determining a causal association.

Health

Fiona Stanley

Fiona Juliet Stanley is an Australian epidemiologist noted for her public health work, and her research into child and maternal health, and birth disorders such as cerebral palsy. Stanley is the Patron of the Telethon Institute for Child Health Research and a Distinguished Professorial Fellow in the School of Paediatrics and Child Health at the University of Western Australia. Between 1990 and December 2011 Stanley was the founding director of the Telethon Institute.

Health

William Foege

William Herbert Foege M.D., M.P.H. (; born March 12, 1936) is an American epidemiologist who is credited with "devising the global strategy that led to the eradication of smallpox in the late 1970s".

Health

Donald Henderson

Donald Ainslie Henderson was an American medical doctor, educator, and epidemiologist who directed a 10-year international effort (1967–1977) that eradicated smallpox throughout the world and launched international childhood vaccination programs. From 1977 to 1990, he was Dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health. Later, he played a leading role in instigating national programs for public health preparedness and response following biological attacks and national disasters. At the time of his death, he was Professor and Dean Emeritus of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and Professor of Medicine and Public Health at the University of Pittsburgh, as well as Distinguished Scholar at the UPMC Center for Health Security.

Health

Selma Dritz

Selma Kaderman Dritz was an American physician and epidemiologist who worked in San Francisco, California, where she began tracking the first known cases of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) in the early 1980s.

Health

Alice Stewart

Dr Alice Mary Stewart, née Naish was a physician and epidemiologist specialising in social medicine and the effects of radiation on health. Her study of radiation-induced illness among workers at the Hanford plutonium production plant, Washington, is frequently cited by those who seek to demonstrate that even very low doses of radiation cause substantial hazard. She was the first person to demonstrate the link between x-rays of pregnant women and disease in their children. She was awarded the Right Livelihood Award in 1986.

Health

Kate Pickett

Kate Pickett, FRSA is a British epidemiologist who is Professor of Epidemiology in the Department of Health Sciences at the University of York and was a National Institute for Health Research Career Scientist from 2007-2012. She co-authored The Spirit Level: Why More Equal Societies Almost Always Do Better and is a co-founder of The Equality Trust. Pickett was awarded a 2013 Silver Rose Award from Solidar for championing equality and the 2014 Charles Cully Memorial Medal by the Irish Cancer Society.

Health

Elizabeth Whelan

Elizabeth M. Whelan was an American epidemiologist best known for challenging government regulations of the consumer products, food, and pharmaceuticals industries that arose from what she said was faulty science. In 1978, she founded the American Council on Science and Health (ACSH) to provide a formal foundation for her work. She also wrote, or co-wrote, more than 20 books and over 300 articles in scientific journals and lay publications.

Health

Seth Berkley

Seth Franklin Berkley, M.D. is a medical epidemiologist by training. He is the CEO of the GAVI Alliance and a global advocate on the power of vaccines. He is also the founder and former President and CEO of the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI). After graduation from McBurney School, New York, in 1974, he received a Bachelor of Science and medical degrees from Brown University, and trained in internal medicine at Harvard University. Berkley has been featured on the cover of Newsweek and recognized by Wired Magazine as among "The Wired 25"—a salute to dreamers, inventors, mavericks and leaders—as well as by TIME magazine as one of the "100 Most Influential People in the World" in 2009. In 2010, Fortune magazine named Berkley as one of its "Global Forum Visionaries." Speaking at the TED 2010 conference, Dr. Berkley explains how innovative vaccine design and production technologies are bringing us closer to controlling global health threats like flu and HIV.

Health

Henry Whitehead (priest)

Henry Whitehead was a Church of England priest and the assistant curate of St Luke's Church in Soho, London, during the 1854 cholera outbreak.