logo

Video encyclopedia

Fictional locations

Popular in this category (475)

Art

Tower of Babel

The Tower of Babel as told in Genesis 11:1-9 is an origin myth meant to explain why the world's peoples speak different languages.

Art

Purgatory

In Roman Catholic theology, purgatory is an intermediate state after physical death in which some of those ultimately destined for heaven must first "undergo purification, so as to achieve the holiness necessary to enter the joy of heaven," holding that "certain offenses can be forgiven in this age, but certain others in the age to come." And that entrance into Heaven requires the "remission before God of the temporal punishment due to sins whose guilt has already been forgiven," for which indulgences may be given which remove "either part or all of the temporal punishment due to sin," such as an "unhealthy attachment" to sin. Only those who die in the state of grace but have not yet fulfilled the temporal punishment due to their sin can be in purgatory, and therefore, no one in purgatory will remain forever in that state nor go to hell. The notion of purgatory is associated particularly with the Latin Church.

Art

Shangri-La

Shangri-La is a fictional place described in the 1933 novel Lost Horizon by British author James Hilton. Hilton describes Shangri-La as a mystical, harmonious valley, gently guided from a lamasery, enclosed in the western end of the Kunlun Mountains. Shangri-La has become synonymous with any earthly paradise, particularly a mythical Himalayan utopia – a permanently happy land, isolated from the world. In the novel, the people who live at Shangri-La are almost immortal, living hundreds of years beyond the normal lifespan and only very slowly aging in appearance. The name also evokes the imagery of exoticism of the Orient.

Art

Atlantis (DC Comics)

Atlantis is a fictional aquatic civilization appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics. The first version of Atlantis within the DC Universe debuted in Action Comics #18, and was conceived by Gardner F. Fox and Fred Guardineer.

Art

Gotham City

Gotham City, or simply Gotham, is a fictional American city appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics, best known as the home of Batman. The city was first identified as Batman's place of residence in Batman #4 and has since been the primary setting of stories featuring the character.

Art

Spider-Verse

"Spider-Verse" is a 2014 comic book storyline published by Marvel Comics. It features multiple alternative versions of Spider-Man that had appeared in various media, all under attack by Morlun and his family, the Inheritors. Beginning in August 2014, the event was preceded by two new issues of the cancelled Superior Spider-Man, issues of Spider-Man 2099 and a five issue run of one shots-all under the Edge of Spider-Verse banner.

Art

Ego the Living Planet

Ego the Living Planet is a fictional character appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. The character first appeared in Thor #132 and was created by writer Stan Lee and artist Jack Kirby.

Art

Carcosa

Carcosa is a fictional city in the Ambrose Bierce short story "An Inhabitant of Carcosa" (1886). In Bierce's story, the ancient and mysterious city is barely described, and is viewed only in hindsight by a character who once lived there. Its name may be derived from the medieval city of Carcassonne in southern France, whose Latin name was "Carcaso".

Art

Latveria

Latveria is a fictional nation appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. It is depicted within the storylines of Marvel's comic titles as an isolated European country ruled by the fictional Supreme Lord Doctor Doom, supposedly located in the Banat region. It is surrounded by the Carpathian Mountains, and also borders Symkaria to the south. Its capital is Doomstadt.

Art

Death Star

Death Star is the name of a number of fictional mobile space stations and galactic superweapons featured in the Star Wars space opera franchise. The first Death Star is stated to be more than 100 km to 160 km in diameter, depending on source. It is crewed by an estimated 1.7 million military personnel and 400,000 droids. One blast of its superweapon delivers energy comparable to that released by the Sun in an entire week. The second Death Star is significantly larger, between 160 km to 900 km in diameter depending on source, and technologically more advanced than its predecessor. Both versions of these moon-sized fortresses are designed for massive power projection capabilities, capable of destroying multiple naval fleets or entire planets with one blast from their superlasers.

Art

Tatooine

Tatooine is a fictional desert planet that appears in the Star Wars space opera franchise. It is beige-coloured and is depicted as a remote, desolate world orbiting a pair of binary stars, and inhabited by human settlers and a variety of other life forms. The planet was first seen in the original 1977 film Star Wars, and has to date featured in a total of five Star Wars theatrical films.

Art

Arkham Asylum

The Elizabeth Arkham Asylum for the Criminally Insane, typically called Arkham Asylum or simply Arkham, is a fictional psychiatric hospital appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics, commonly in stories featuring the superhero Batman. Arkham Asylum first appeared in Batman #258, written by Dennis O'Neil with art by Irv Novick.

Art

Saint Marie (fictional island)

Saint Marie is a fictional island in the Lesser Antilles which serves as the setting for the BBC crime drama television series Death in Paradise.

Art

Neverland

Neverland is a fictional island featured in the works of J. M. Barrie and those based on them. It is an imaginary faraway place, where Peter Pan, Tinker Bell, the Lost Boys and other mythical creatures and beings live. Although not all people who come to Neverland cease to age, its best known resident famously refused to grow up. The term is often used as a metaphor for eternal childhood, immortality, and escapism. The concept was first introduced as "the Never Never Land" in the theatre play Peter Pan, or The Boy Who Wouldn't Grow Up by Scottish writer J. M. Barrie, first staged in 1904.