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"Luther" returns for a 5th season

Luther is a British crime drama television series starring Idris Elba as the title character DCI John Luther, written by Neil Cross. A fifth series comprising four episodes was announced in 2017. Filming started in early 2018. Ruth Wilson was confirmed to be returning as Alice Morgan for series five.

"A Series of Unfortunate Events" returns for a 3rd season

Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events, or simply A Series of Unfortunate Events, is an American black comedy-drama web television series from Netflix, developed by Mark Hudis and Barry Sonnenfeld. A third season, which was announced in April 2017, consists of seven episodes and adapts the remaining four books.

Instanbul nightclub shooting

At 01:15 am a local time a gunman shot and killed 39 people and wounded 70 others at the Reina nightclub in the Ortaköy neighborhood of Istanbul, where hundreds had been celebrating the new year. Uzbekistan-born Abdulkadir Masharipov was arrested in Istanbul on 17 January. The Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant claimed credit for his actions.

The Address Downtown Dubai burns over midnight

During the New Year's Eve, a fire broke out on the 20th floor of the Address Downton, a hotel in Dubai. Strong winds caused a fire to spread quickly throughout the building. About 14 people were slightly injured and one was moderately injured. One person got a heart attack during the evacuation.

2014

Winter Classic in Michigan

The 2014 NHL Winter Classic was an outdoor regular season National Hockey League game, part of the Winter Classic series. The visiting Toronto Maple Leafs defeated the Detroit Red Wings, 3–2, in a shootout to move past the Red Wings in the Atlantic Division.

Ivory Coast New Year stampede

The 2013 Houphouët-Boigny stampede occurred as crowds departed a New Year's Eve fireworks display in Abidjan, Ivory Coast. It resulted in 61 deaths and over 200 injuries, mostly women and children. This was the second time in four years that a fatal stampede occurred at the stadium.

Ada Bridge is opened

The Ada Bridge is a cable-stayed bridge over the Sava river in Belgrade, Serbia. The bridge pylon is located on the tip of the island, which has been reinforced with large amounts of concrete and has been slightly enlarged to provide stronger foundations. Construction began in 2008, and the bridge opened in 2012.

Suicide car bomb detonates at a volleyball tournament in Pakistan

The 2010 Lakki Marwat suicide bombing occurred in the Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa province of Pakistan. The suicide bomber blew up his sports utility vehicle filled with explosives in the middle of a crowd watching a volleyball game. At least 105 people died and more than 100 were injured.

Duffy's debut album tops charts with almost 1.7M copies sold

Rockferry is the debut studio album by Duffy. It won the Grammy Award for Best Pop Vocal Album and it was the fourth best selling album of 2008 worldwide. The album includes singles such as Mercy, Warwick Avenue, Stepping Stone or Rain on Your Parade.

Santika Club fire

A huge fire occurred during the New Year's Eve celebration in the Santika Club, Bangkok, Thailand, killing 66 people and injuring another 222. Coincidentally a band called "Burn" was just playing and the party was named "Santika's Last Night".

Adam Air Flight 574 crashes

The aircraft crashed into the Makassar Strait near Polewali in Sulawesi. All 102 people on board died. The final report concluded that the pilots lost control of the aircraft after they became preoccupied with troubleshooting the inertial navigation system and inadvertently disconnected the autopilot.

The Euro currency is introduced in 11 countries

The euro was introduced to world financial markets as an accounting currency, replacing the former European Currency Unit at a ratio of 1:1. Physical euro coins and banknotes entered into circulation on 1 January 2002, making it the day-to-day operating currency of its original members.

1998

Helen Wills Moody dies

Helen Willis was an American tennis player. She rose to prominence for holding the top position in women's tennis for a total of 9 years. During her career, she won 31 Grand Slam tournament titles, including 19 singles titles. She died of natural causes, aged 92.

The World Trade Organization goes into effect

The World Trade Organization is an intergovernmental organization that regulates international trade. The WTO was founded on 1 January 1995 with the Marrakesh Agreement signed by 123 nations on 15 April 1994 and replaced the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade.

Dissolution of Czechoslovakia

The Dissolution of Czechoslovakia was an event that saw the self-determined split of the federal state of Czechoslovakia into the Czechia and Slovakia. It is also known as the Velvet Divorce, referring to the bloodless Velvet Revolution of 1989 that ended the rule of the Communist Party of Czechoslovakia.

"Les Miserables" opens at Festival Theatre, Adelaide

Les Misérables is a musical based on the five-part novel by French poet and novelist Victor Hugo. It premiered in Paris in 1980 with music by Claude-Michel Schönberg. It is the fifth longest-running Broadway show in history. The show was nominated for 12 Tony Awards and won eight, including Best Musical and Best Original Score.

Montreal Protocol enters into force

The Montreal Protocol is an international treaty designed to protect the ozone layer by phasing out the production of numerous substances that are responsible for ozone depletion. Due to its widespread adoption and implementation, it has been hailed as an example of exceptional international co-operation.

Barbra Streisand & Jon Peters relationship breaks up

Barbra Streisand, an American singer, started a relationship with Jon Peters, an American movie producer, in 1974. Despite their relationship, Jon went on to be Barbra's manager and producer. She is also the godmother of his daughters, Caleigh and Skye Peters.

The ARPANET network is changing into the internet

The Advanced Research Projects Agency Network was an early packet switching network and the first network to implement the protocol suite TCP/IP. Both technologies became the technical foundation of the Internet. ARPANET was decommissioned in 1990 and by 1995, the Internet was fully commercialized in the U.S.

1980

Frank Clifford Wykoff dies

Frank Clifford Wykoff was an American athlete and triple gold medal winner in 4 × 100 m relay at the Olympic Games. In 1936, he earned a master's degree and became a teacher and administrator. He died in Altadena, California, aged 70.

China and the U.S. established diplomatic relations

The Joint Communiqué on the Establishment of Diplomatic Relations established official relations between the United States and the People's Republic of China. Jimmy Carter announced the withdrawal of all U.S. military personnel from Taiwan and the end to the Sino-American Mutual Defense Treaty signed with China.

Air India Flight 855 crashes

Air India Flight 855 was a scheduled passenger flight that crashed during the evening of New Year's Day 1978 about 3 km (1.9 mi) off the coast of Bandra, Mumbai. The crash killed all 213 passengers and crew and is believed to have been caused by the captain had become spatially disoriented.

Charter 77 is signed

Charter 77 was an informal civic initiative in communist Czechoslovakia from 1976 to 1992. Spreading the text of the document was considered a political crime by the communist regime. After the 1989 Velvet Revolution, many of its members played important roles in Czech and Slovak politics.

NBC replaces the peacock logo

In 1976, NBC updated its logo with the introduction of an abstract "N", a bold and bright design consisting of two trapezoids – one red and one blue. On 10 January NBC's TV show Saturday Night hosted Chevy Chase and Gilda Radner who mocked the new logo and its $1 million design cost.

Top aides to President are found guilty of obstruction

The scandal led to the discovery of multiple cases of abuse of power by members of the Nixon administration that led to the resignation of Nixon. The scandal also resulted in the indictment of 69 people, with trials or pleas resulting in 48 being found guilty, many of whom were Nixon’s top administration officials.

Maurice Chevallier dies

Maurice Chevalier was a French actor, cabaret singer, and entertainer. He is known for his songs such as Valentine, Louise, Mimi or Thank Heaven for Little Girls. Chevalier has a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame at 2651 Vine Street. He died in Paris of kidney failure, aged 83.

Marmalade are at #1 on the UK singles chart

Ob-La-Di, Ob-La-Da was originally written by Paul McCartney and recorded by the Beatles. It was then covered by the Scottish pop band Marmalade. Their version of the song reached number one on the UK Singles Chart, making them the first Scottish group to ever top that chart.

Simon & Garfunkel's "Sounds of Silence" reaches #1

The Sound of Silence, the folk-rock essential record, was written by Paul Simon over a period of several months in 1963 and 1964. The song was featured in the 1967 film The Graduate. In 2004, it was ranked No. 157 on Rolling Stone's list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

Beatles audition for Decca Records and get reject

Before reaching international popularity, the Beatles auditioned for Decca Records in West Hampstead, north London. However, they were rejected and Decca selected Brian Poole and the Tremeloes instead. This unfortunate decision is considered one of the biggest mistakes in music industry history.

Johnny Cash plays his first concert for prison inmates

The live albums Johnny Cash at San Quentin and Johnny Cash at Folsom Prison were a huge commercial success, both reaching number 1 on Billboard country album music. In 1969 Johnny Cash became an international hit when he eclipsed even the Beatles by selling 6.5 million albums.

Far side of the Moon

Soviet probe Luna 3 photographed the far side of the Moon for the first time in history. The pictures were not good, but they caused nonetheless. The terrain on the far side is very different from the near side. Reasons for this are not fully understood even by today’s geologists. Luna 3 also performed first gravity assist maneuver ever.

Fidel Castro seizes power in Cuba

Fidel Castro governed the Republic of Cuba as Prime Minister from 1959 to 1976 and then as President from 1976 to 2008. Adopting a Marxist–Leninist model of development, Castro converted Cuba into a one-party, socialist state.

The European Economic Community is formed

The European Economic Community was created by the Treaty of Rome of 1957. The Community's initial aim was to bring about economic integration, including a common market and customs union, among its six founding members: Belgium, France, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands and West Germany.

Canadian citizenship is created

The Canadian citizenship was created by an Act of the Parliament of Canada, which separated Canadian citizenship from British nationality. It came into effect under the government of Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King. The Act was an important expression of Canada’s emerging sense of national identity.

1946

Rivellino is born

Rivellino is a former Brazilian professional soccer player. He is widely regarded as one of the most graceful football players ever, and among the best midfielders of his generation. In 2004, he was named by Pelé in the FIFA 100 list of the world's greatest living players.

1945

Jacky Ickx is born

Jacques Bernard "Jacky" Ickx is a Belgian former racing driver who won the 24 Hours of Le Mans six times, achieved 8 wins and 25 podium finishes in Formula One and won the Can-Am Championship in 1979. He is married to a Burundian singer Khadja Nin. In the early 1980s, Ickx became a resident of Monaco.

Twenty-six countries sign the Declaration of the United Nations

The Declaration by United Nations was a World War II document agreed on 1 January 1942 during the Arcadia Conference by 26 governments. It was the basis of the United Nations founded later in 1945.

Physicist Edward J. Hoffman is born

Edward Joseph Hoffman was an American physicist who helped to invent the first human PET scanner, a commonly used whole-body scanning procedure for detecting diseases like cancer. In 1973, Hoffman together with Michael Phelps developed the Positron Emission Tomography scanner.

British biologist Martin Evan is born

Sir Martin John Evans is a British biologist who, with Matthew Kaufman, was the first to culture mice embryonic stem cells and cultivate them in a laboratory in 1981. He is also known for his work in the development of the knockout mouse and the technology of gene targeting.

1935

The First Orange Bowl

The 1st Orange Bowl was a college football bowl game between the Bucknell Bison and Miami Hurricanes. It was the first edition of the Orange Bowl and took place at Miami Field on the same site as the Orange Bowl stadium. Bucknell won the game 26–0.

1935

The First Sugar Bowl

The 1st Sugar Bowl was played between the Temple Owls and Tulane Green Wave. Tulane won the game 20–14. It was played at the Tulane Stadium in New Orleans, Louisiana and attended by 22,206 people. The game started an annual New Year’s Day football classic.

Alcatraz becomes a federal prison

The military prison facility was turned into a federal one, housing the most dangerous of the dangerous law offenders. The civilian prison was designed with a much bigger focus on security than its military counterpart. New cell bars and window covers made of tool-proof steel were deployed in the prison.

First air-conditioned building is built

280 feet tall Milam Building in downtown San Antonio, Texas, was the first high-rise air-conditioned office building. The building was designed by George Willis and named in honor of the Republic of Texas historical figure Benjamin Milam, noted for his leadership during the Texas Revolution.

Norway's capital Christiania changes name to Oslo

Norway wanted to go back to the medieval name Oslo, which the city already had during the medieval times. The city was then named Christiana after the Danish king Christian IV. The current name Oslo is more connected to the glorious days of medieval independence.

Edwin Hubble finds that there are other galaxies in the universe

Edwin Powell Hubble, an American astronomer, provided evidence that the recessional velocity of a galaxy increases with its distance from the earth. He also discovered that many objects previously thought to be clouds of dust and gas and classified as "nebulae" were actually galaxies beyond the Milky Way.

The Republic of China is established

The Republic of China was a state that occupied the present-day territories of China, Taiwan, and Mongolia. This era lasted from 1912 to 1949 and was preceded by the last imperial dynasty of China, the Qing dynasty, and ended with the Chinese Civil War. The victorious Communist Party of China then established the People's Republic of China.

1902

The First Rose Bowl

The Rose Bowl started the tradition of New Year's Day bowl games. The 1st game featured Michigan Wolverines football team, representing the East, who crushed a from Stanford University, representing the West, by a score of 49–0. The fame was played at Tournament Park in Pasadena, California.

The Commonwealth of Australia is founded

The Federation of Australia was the process by which the six separate British self-governing colonies of Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria, Tasmania, South Australia, and Western Australia agreed to unite and form the Commonwealth of Australia, establishing a system of federalism in Australia.

German physicist Heinrich Hertz dies

Heinrich Hertz was a German physicist who proved the existence of the electromagnetic waves theorized by James Clerk Maxwell's electromagnetic theory of light. He was not first. Anglo-American inventor David Hughes produced electromagnetic waves in 1879. Hertz, however, correctly understood their nature. The unit of frequency was named the "hertz" in his honor.

Indian theoretical physicist Satyendra Nath Bose is born

Satyendra Nath Bose was an Indian physicist specializing in theoretical physics. He is known for his work on quantum mechanics, providing the foundation for Bose-Einstein statistics and the theory of the Bose-Einstein condensate. He was awarded India's second highest civilian award, the Padma Vibhushan in 1954.

1863

Pierre de Coubertin is born

Pierre de Coubertin founded the International Olympic Committee. He is also considered the father of the modern Olympic Games. The Pierre de Coubertin medal is an award given by the International Olympic Committee to athletes that demonstrate the spirit of sportsmanship in the Olympic Games.

Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein" is published anonymously

Frankenstein tells the story of Victor Frankenstein, a young scientist who creates a grotesque but sapient creature in an unorthodox scientific experiment. Mary Shelley's name 1st appeared on the 2nd edition, which was published in 1823 in France.

Sir Humphry Davy discovers the sensitivity of silver iodide to light

Sir Humphry Davy made many discoveries such as discovering the elemental nature of chlorine and iodine. He is also known for isolating a series of substances for the first time: potassium and sodium, and calcium, strontium, barium, magnesium and boron.

Congress prohibits importation of slaves

The Act Prohibiting Importation of Slaves stated that no new slaves were permitted to be imported into the USA. It was promoted by President Thomas Jefferson. However, the Act was not always well enforced and slaves continued to be smuggled in limited numbers.

Great Britain unites with Ireland

The Acts of Union 1800 were parallel acts of the Parliament of Great Britain and the Parliament of Ireland which united the Kingdom of Great Britain and the Kingdom of Ireland. The merged Parliament of the United Kingdom had its first meeting 22 days later.

Swiss mathematician Johann Bernoulli dies

Johann Bernoulli was a Swiss mathematician known for his contributions to infinitesimal calculus and educating Leonhard Euler. He died in 1748, aged 80.

Pedro Álvares Cabral discovers Rio de Janeiro

A Portuguese expedition under explorer Gaspar de Lemos, captain of a ship in Pedro Álvares Cabral's fleet, first encountered Guanabara Bay on 1 January 1502. Back then, the region of Rio was inhabited by the Tupi, Puri, Botocudo, and Maxakalí peoples.

Italian statesman Lorenzo de' Medici is born

Lorenzo de' Medici was an Italian statesman, de facto ruler of the Florentine Republic and the most powerful and enthusiastic patron of Renaissance culture in Italy. He was a magnate, diplomat, politician and patron of scholars, artists and poets. As a patron, he is best known for his sponsorship of artists such as Botticelli and Michelangelo.

Anniversaries of famous