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Late-night chat-show Conan celebrates its 1000th episode

The episode was titled Conan Without Borders: Made in Mexico. Visit was made in response to actions and effort made by President Donald Trump to build a wall across the southern border. Guests included Diego Luna and Vicente Fox, and stand-up performance from Sofia Niño De Rivera.

Final episode of "Agent Carter" airs

Marvel's Agent Carter, or simply Agent Carter, is an American television series created for ABC by Christopher Markus & Stephen McFeely, inspired by the 2011 film Captain America: The First Avenger, and the 2013 Marvel One-Shot short film of the same name.

2015

Cuban American baseball player Minnie Minoso dies at 92

Orestes "Minnie" Miñoso, nicknamed "The Cuban Comet" and "Mr. White Sox", was found dead in the driver's seat of a car near a gas station in Chicago at 1 am in March 2015, after attending a friend's birthday party the previous day. An autopsy found that he died from a torn pulmonary artery resulting from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

Kunming terrorist attack

The attack took place at Kunming Railway Station in Kunming, Yunnan, China. In the late evening, a group of men and women, armed with knives attacked passengers present at the place. Over 140 civilians were injured and 31 others were killed. Kunming government linked the attack to Xinjiang separatist terrorists.

A stage production of "The Wizard of Oz" opens at the London Palladium

After previews in the West End, the musical opened in 2011, directed by Jeremy Sams, and closed in 2012. The original cast included Danielle Hope as Dorothy Gale, Michael Crawford as the Wizard and Hannah Waddingham as the Wicked Witch of the West.

A Broadway revival of "Guys and Dolls" opens

Guys and Dolls is a musical with music and lyrics by Frank Loesser and book by Jo Swerling and Abe Burrows. It is based on "The Idyll of Miss Sarah Brown" and "Blood Pressure", which are two short stories by Damon Runyon, and also borrows characters and plot elements from other Runyon stories – most notably "Pick the Winner".

Protests in Yerevan, 10 people were killed

At noon on 1 March, a crowd of at least 10,000 protesters held a rally in front of the French Embassy.Police officers pulled away from the area by 16:00, as they were overwhelmed by the growing number of demonstrators. In the evening, clashes broke out between riot police and about 2,000 protesters who barricaded themselves at Miasnikyan Square.

"Ice Age: The Meltdown" premieres in Belgium

Ice Age: The Meltdown is a 2006 American computer-animated comedy adventure film produced by Blue Sky Studios and released by 20th Century Fox. The film premiered in Belgium in March 2006. It was eventually released in 70 countries, with the last release being in China in June 2006.

Wikipedia reaches its one millionth article

Wikipedia is a multilingual, web-based, free-content encyclopedia project supported by the Wikimedia Foundation and based on a model of openly editable content. By 2006, it's the number of articles has risen up to one million. With over five and a half million articles, the English Wikipedia is the largest of the more than 290 Wikipedia encyclopedias.

Operation Anaconda begins in eastern Afghanistan

CIA Paramilitary Officers, working with their allies, attempted to destroy al-Qaeda and Taliban forces. The operation took place in the Shahi-Kot Valley and Arma Mountains southeast of Zormat. This operation was the first large-scale battle in the United States War in Afghanistan since the Battle of Tora Bora.

Need for Speed: High Stakes is released

Need for Speed: High Stakes, released as Need for Speed: Road Challenge in Europe is a 1999 racing video game released by Electronic Arts for the PlayStation and for MS Windows a few months later. It is particularly notable within the series for being the first installment to include a vehicle damage model and a genre-standard "career" system.

Titanic becomes the first film to gross over $1 billion

Titanic by James Cameron remained the highest-grossing film of all time until Avatar surpassed it in 2010. At the time, it was also the most expensive film ever made, with a production budget of $200 million. Titanic won 11 Academy Awards, including the awards for Best Picture and Best Director.

Petronas Towers are completed

Petronas Towers are twin skyscrapers in Kuala Lumpur, the construction of which took 3 years. They were the tallest buildings in the world till 2004 and are currently the tallest twin towers. The towers were built by two different constructing consortiums, one for each tower, in order to finish them in time.

Kuala Lumpur Tower is completed

Kuala Lumpur Tower is communication tower used for television and radio broadcasting. It is the 7th tallest, a freestanding tower in the world. The towers also hold round public observatory and restaurant, both providing panoramic view of the city. It became a symbol of Kuala Lumpur.

1993

Professional ice hockey team Anaheim Ducks is founded

The Anaheim Ducks are a professional ice hockey team based in Anaheim, California. They are members of the Pacific Division of the Western Conference of the NHL. The club was founded in 1993 by The Walt Disney Company as the Mighty Ducks of Anaheim, a name based on the 1992 film The Mighty Ducks.

Actor Jackie Coogan dies of a heart attack at 69

John Leslie "Jackie" Coogan was an American actor and comedian who began his movie career as a child actor in silent films. Charlie Chaplin's film classic The Kid made him one of the first child stars in film history. After suffering from heart and kidney ailments, he succumbed to heart failure in March 1984, at age 69, in Santa Monica, California.

Ellington's musical "Sophisticated Ladies" opens

Sophisticated Ladies, based on the music of Duke Ellington opened at the Lunt-Fontanne Theatre, on Broadway. It was performed 767 times there during 22 months. A reception was quite positive, praising the review for operating on the truly grand scale. It won Theatre World Award and 2 Tony awards out of 8 nominations.

1980

“Dixie” Dean, who still holds an English record, dies

Dixie Dean was an English footballer who played as a centre forward. He died at age 73 after suffering a heart attack at Everton's home ground Goodison Park whilst watching a match against their closest rivals, Liverpool. It was the first time that Dean had visited Goodison Park in several years, due to ill health.

"Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street" opens on Broadway

Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street is a 1979 musical thriller with music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and book by Hugh Wheeler. The musical is based on the 1973 play Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street by Christopher Bond. Sweeney Todd opened on Broadway in 1979 and in the West End in 1980.

Chaplin's coffin and remains are stolen from a Swiss cemetery

Charlie Chaplin's coffin was dug up and stolen from its grave by 2 immigrants, Roman Wardas, from Poland, and Gantcho Ganev, from Bulgaria. The body was held for ransom in an attempt to extort money from Oona Chaplin. The pair were caught in a large police operation and Chaplin's coffin was found buried in a field in the nearby village of Noville.

Colour television is transmitted in Australia for the first time

In 1972 it was announced that all stations would move to colour in 1975, using the European PAL standard mandated in 1968. The slogan used to sell colour television to the Australian public was 'March first into colour'. Australia was to have one of the fastest change-overs to colour television in the world.

Pink Floyd release their album "Dark Side of the Moon"

The Dark Side of the Moon is the eighth studio album by English rock band Pink Floyd, released in March 1973 by Harvest Records. The album's themes explore conflict, greed, the passage of time, and mental illness, the latter partly inspired by the deteriorating mental state of founding member and principal contributor, Syd Barrett.

1972

Wilt Chamberlain becomes the first NBA player to score 30,000 points

Wilt Chamberlain was the 1st player to score over 30,000 points in a career. Back then he was playing for Los Angeles Lakers. He finished his career with 31,419 points. Besides this achievement, he holds many other NBA records in scoring, rebounding, and durability categories.

End of US commercial whale hunting

The origins of whaling in the United States of America date to the 17th century in New England and peaked in 1846-52. New Bedford, Massachusetts, sent out its last whaler, the John R. Mantra, in 1927. Over 40 years later, at the beginning of March 1970, the commercial whale hunting has come to its end.

Jim Morrison is arrested for exposing himself at Dinner Key Auditorium

During a concert in March 1969, at the Dinner Key Auditorium in Miami, Morrison attempted to spark a riot in the audience, in part by screaming "You wanna see my cock?" and other obscenities. He failed, but six warrants for his arrest were issued by the Dade County Police department three days later for indecent exposure, among other things.

1969

NY Yankees' Mickey Mantle retires

Mickey Charles Mantle was an American professional baseball player. Mantle played his entire Major League Baseball career with the New York Yankees as a center fielder and first baseman, from 1951 through 1968. Mantle announced his retirement in March 1969. He gave a "farewell" speech on "Mickey Mantle Day" in June 1969 in Yankee Stadium.

UK announces adoption of decimal currency system

The adoption of decimal currency system was announced in March 1964, and in February 1971, the UK decimalized the pound sterling, replacing the shilling and penny with a single subdivision, the new penny. For example, a price tag of £1 12s 6d became ​£1.62 1⁄2. The word "new" was omitted from coins minted after 1981.

Peace Corps is established by President Kennedy

The Peace Corps is a volunteer program run by the United States government. Its official mission is to provide social and economic development abroad through technical assistance, while promoting mutual understanding between Americans and populations served.

Soviet Venus landing

Russian space probe Venera 3 crash-landed on the surface of Venus. It was the first landing on the surface of a foreign planet. However, the communication systems of the probe failed before it reached Venus. Venera 3 did not transmit any scientific data. The probe was designed by the Lavochkin Bureau, in contrast to the earlier Soviet probes designed by Sergei Korolev's OKB-1.

Bikini H-bomb

The United States detonated a thermonuclear device at the Bikini Atoll in the Pacific Ocean. The operation was codenamed Castle Bravo. The bomb's yield was 15 megatons of TNT. It was 6 times the predicted 6 megatons, due to unforeseen additional reactions in the device. It was the most powerful U. S. nuclear detonation.

1949

Joe Louis retires as heavyweight boxing champion

Joseph Louis Barrow, best known as Joe Louis and nicknamed the "Brown Bomber", was an American professional boxer who competed from 1934 to 1951. He retired as a heavyweight boxing champion in the first days of March 1949.

US President Franklin D. Roosevelt announces success of Yalta Conference

The Yalta Conference was the World War II meeting of the heads of government of the United States, the United Kingdom and the Soviet Union for the purpose of discussing Germany and Europe's postwar reorganization. The meeting was intended mainly to discuss the re-establishment of the nations of war-torn Europe.

Three-day Battle of Java Sea ends

The Battle of Java was a battle of the Pacific theatre of World War II. It occurred on the island of Java. It involved forces from the Empire of Japan and Allied personnel. Allied commanders signed a formal surrender at Japanese headquarters at Bandung.

Captain America first appears in comic book form

Captain America was created by cartoonists Joe Simon and Jack Kirby. The character was designed as a patriotic supersoldier who often fought the Axis powers of World War II and was Timely Comics', a predecessor of Marvel Comics, most popular character during the wartime period.

The Hoover Dam is completed

Hoover Dam is a concrete arch-gravity dam in the Black Canyon of the Colorado River, on the border between the U.S. states of Nevada and Arizona. It was constructed between 1931 and 1936 during the Great Depression. Originally known as Boulder Dam from 1933, it was officially renamed Hoover Dam by a joint resolution of Congress in 1947.

Three passenger trains are buried by the worst snow slide in US history

Small railroad community in northeastern King County, Washington, US, experienced a terrible blizzard. During a thunderstorm, lightning hit the hills, starting a huge avalanche. It hit the railroad depot, throwing the trains downhill, into a river. Out of all people there, 96 died and 23 were saved by railroad employees.

Great Wellington train disaster

The avalanche missed the Bailets Hotel, but hit the railroad depot. Most of the passengers and crew were asleep aboard their trains. The impact threw the trains 150 feet downhill and into the Tye River valley. Ninety six people were killed, including 35 passengers, 58 Great Northern employees, and three railroad employees.

British actor David Niven is born

James David Graham Niven was an English actor, memoirist, and novelist. His many roles included Squadron Leader Peter Carter in A Matter of Life and Death, Phileas Fogg in Around the World in 80 Days, and Sir Charles Lytton in The Pink Panther. He won the Academy Award for Best Actor for his performance in Separate Tables.

American bandleader and jazz composer Glenn Miller is born

Glenn Miller was born in Clarinda, Iowa, US. He started with music in his early years, playing in the town orchestra. By the end of high school, he formed a band with classmates, in order to become a musician. Later he found a way to differentiate his band's style from others, scoring 23 No. 1 hits in four years.

Yellowstone becomes world's first national park

Yellowstone National Park is a national park located in the U.S. states of Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho. It was established by the U.S. Congress and signed into law by President Ulysses S. Grant. Yellowstone was the first national park in the U.S. and is also widely held to be the first national park in the world.

Nebraska becomes 37th US state

Nebraska is a state that lies in both the Great Plains and the Midwestern United States. Nebraska was admitted as the 37th state of the United States. It is the only state in the United States whose legislature is unicameral and officially nonpartisan.

Howard University is established

Howard University is a federally chartered, private, coeducational, nonsectarian, historically black university in Washington, D.C. It is categorized by the Carnegie Foundation as a research university with higher research activity and is accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education.

US President John Tyler signs a resolution annexing the Republic of Texas

President Tyler signed the annexation bill, and on his last day in office, he forwarded the House version to Texas, offering immediate annexation. When Polk took office the next day, he encouraged Texas to accept the Tyler offer. Texas ratified the agreement with popular approval from Texans.

Ohio becomes 17th state of the Union

Ohio is a Midwestern state in the Great Lakes region of the United States. Partitioned from the Northwest Territory, the state was admitted to the Union as the 17th state. Ohio is historically known as the "Buckeye State" after its Ohio buckeye trees, and Ohioans are also known as "Buckeyes".

The city of Rio de Janeiro is founded

Rio de Janeiro is the second-most populous municipality in Brazil and the sixth-most populous in the Americas. The metropolis is an anchor to the Rio de Janeiro metropolitan area, the second-most populous metropolitan area in Brazil and sixth-most populous in the Americas.

Anniversaries of the (in)famous