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Flashback calendar

Camp Shaheen attack

In 2017, at least ten Taliban fighters attacked Camp Shaheen, headquarters of the 209 Corps of the Afghan National Army, near Mazar-i-Sharif, Balkh Province. The death toll was unclear—official Afghan government statements said about 140 people were killed and 160 injured, while media reports said as many as 256 were dead.

2016

MLB cancels Puerto Rico series over Zika concerns

Major League Baseball announced that a series of games between the Miami Marlins and Pittsburgh Pirates scheduled to be played at the end of the month in San Juan, Puerto Rico would be relocated to Marlins Park in Miami, Florida after a number of players on each team voiced concerns regarding the threat of Zika exposure.

Singer Prince dies

Prince Rogers Nelson was an American singer, songwriter, musician, record producer, actor, and director. Born and raised in Minneapolis, Minnesota, Prince was known for his electric work, flamboyant stage presence, extravagant fashion sense and use of makeup, and wide vocal range. He died of an accidental overdose of fentanyl at the age of 57.

Video game Assassin's Creed Chronicles: China is released

Assassin's Creed Chronicles is a series of video games in the Assassin's Creed franchise. The series consists of three games developed by Climax Studios and published by Ubisoft. The games feature new protagonists and a design that is new to the franchise, a 2.5D world inspired by traditional brush paintings.

Flint water crisis

The Flint water crisis began as the drinking water source for the city was changed to the Flint River. Because of insufficient water treatment, over 100,000 residents were potentially exposed to high levels of lead in the drinking water.

"Macbeth" opens on Broadway at the Ethel Barrymore Theatre

Macbeth is a tragedy by William Shakespeare. Of all the plays that Shakespeare wrote during the reign of James I, who was patron of Shakespeare's acting company, Macbeth most clearly reflects the playwright's relationship with his sovereign. The Broadway revival opened at the Ethel Barrymore Theatre, starring Alan Cumming and Jenny Starling.

Sloterdijk train collision

Two trains were involved in a head-on collision at Westerpark, near Sloterdijk, in the west of Amsterdam, Netherlands. Approximately 117 people were injured, one of whom later died in hospital. The collision is thought to have been caused by the driver of one of the trains having passed a red signal.

"Jerusalem" opens on Broadway at the Music Box Theatre

Jerusalem is a play by Jez Butterworth that first opened in the Jerwood Theatre of the Royal Court Theatre in London. Jerusalem then moved to Broadway, opening at the Music Box Theatre. Mark Rylance reprised the role of Rooster, with Mackenzie Crook and most of the original Royal Court cast also transferring.

"Shrek Forever After" premieres at the Tribeca Film Festival

Shrek Forever After is an American 3D computer-animated fantasy comedy film and the fourth installment in the Shrek series, produced by DreamWorks Animation and the sequel to Shrek the Third. The film premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival and was theatrically released by Paramount Pictures.

Over 100,000 flights are canceled

In response to concerns that volcanic ash ejected during the eruptions of Eyjafjallajökull in Iceland would damage aircraft engines, over 100,000 flights to, from and over Europe were canceled during the 8-day travel ban, accounting for 48% of total air traffic and roughly 10 million passengers.

Singer Nina Simone dies

Nina Simone was an American singer, songwriter, pianist, arranger, and activist in the Civil Rights Movement. Simone employed a broad range of musical styles including classical, jazz, blues, folk, R&B, gospel, and pop. She suffered from breast cancer for several years before she died in her sleep at her home in Carry-le-Rouet, Bouches-du-Rhône.

The ashes of Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry are sent into space

In 1997, a Celestis spacecraft with 7 grams of the cremated remains of Roddenberry, along with those of Timothy Leary, Gerard K. O'Neill and 21 other people, was launched into Earth orbit aboard a Pegasus XL rocket from a site near the Canary Islands.

1996

The Bulls finish the season with a 72-10 record

Chicago Bulls finished the season 1995-96 with 72 wins and only 10 losses. Thereby, they bettered previous record from 1972. Combined regular season and postseason record was 87-13, the best in NBA history. Chicago also became champions in the season after winning final matches against Seattle SuperSonics.

"Walker, Texas Ranger" debuts on CBS

Walker, Texas Ranger is an American crime action television series created by Leslie Greif and Paul Haggis. It was inspired by the film Lone Wolf McQuade, with both this series and that film starring Chuck Norris. The show aired on CBS in the spring of 1993, with the first season consisting of three pilot episodes.

The first discoveries of extrasolar planets are announced

Pulsar planets are planets that are found orbiting pulsars or rapidly rotating neutron stars. The first such planet to be discovered was around a millisecond pulsar and was the first extrasolar planet to be confirmed as discovered.

Game console Game Boy is released

The Game Boy was 1st released on the 100th anniversary of Nintendo in Japan. The 8-bit handheld game console was sold either as a standalone unit or bundled with the puzzle game Tetris. The Game Boy and its successor, the Game Boy Color, have sold over 118 million units worldwide.

1989

George W. Bush become CEO of Texas Rangers

In 1989, Bush arranged for a group of investors to purchase a controlling interest in the Texas Rangers baseball franchise for $89 million and invested $500,000 himself to start. He then served as managing general partner for five years.

Video game Super Mario Land is released

Super Mario Land is a side-scrolling platform video game developed and published by Nintendo as a launch title for their Game Boy handheld game console. Unlike other Mario games, Super Mario Land is set in Sarasaland, a new environment depicted in line art, and Mario pursues Princess Daisy.

1 pound coin is introduced in the UK

The British one pound coin is a denomination of the pound sterling. The £1 coin replaced the Bank of England £1 note. It has featured the profile of Queen Elizabeth II since the coin's introduction. Four different portraits of the Queen have been used, with the latest design by Jody Clark being introduced in 2015.

1982

Rosie Ruiz is cheating and loses her title in the Boston Marathon

Rosie Ruiz Vivas is a Cuban American who was declared the winner in the female category for the 84th Boston Marathon in 1980, only to have her title stripped eight days after the race when it was discovered that she had not run the entire course. She is believed to have jumped onto the course about a half-mile before the finish.

The musical "Annie" premieres on Broadway

Annie is a Broadway musical based upon the popular Harold Gray comic strip Little Orphan Annie. The original Broadway production opened in 1977 and ran for nearly six years, setting a record for the Alvin Theatre. It spawned numerous productions in many countries, as well as national tours, and won the Tony Award for Best Musical.

Apollo 16 land

It was the first mission which landed in the lunar highlands. Astronauts John Young and Charles Duke spent seventy-one hours the lunar surface, while Command Module Pilot Ken Mattingly orbited The Moon in the Command Module. Duke and Young conducted three moonwalks, totaling twenty hours and fourteen minutes.

A Transit-5bn satellite fails to reach orbit after launch

The Transit system, also known as NAVSAT or NNSS, was the first satellite navigation system to be used operationally. The system was primarily used by the U.S. Navy to provide accurate location information to its Polaris ballistic missile submarines, and it was also used as a navigation system by the Navy's surface ships.

Brazil inaugurated its new capital Brasilia

Brasília is the federal capital of Brazil and seat of government of the Federal District. The city is located in the Brazilian highlands in the country's center-western region. It was founded in April 1960, to serve as the new national capital. Brasília and its metro are estimated to be Brazil's 3rd most populous city.

Printers end the biggest strike in UK newspaper's history

Significant news events the Fleet Street papers missed because of the strike included Sir Winston Churchill's resignation, the Budget and the announcement of a general election. Printers were striking for a wage increase of just over £2 a week.

Singer Iggy Pop is born

Iggy Pop is an American singer, songwriter, musician, producer, and actor. He was the vocalist of influential proto-punk band the Stooges and is well known for his outrageous and unpredictable stage antics. Iggy Pop's music has encompassed a number of styles over the course of his career.

Queen Elizabeth II is born

Elizabeth was born in London as the first child of the Duke and Duchess of York, later King George VI and Queen Elizabeth. She began to undertake public duties during the WWII, serving in the Auxiliary Territorial Service. She married Philip, Duke of Edinburgh with whom she has four children. In 2017, she became the first British monarch to reach a Sapphire Jubilee.

Exclusion principle

Austrian physicist Wolfgang Pauli published an article in about behavior of electrons in the atom shell. He suggested that the electrons can't occupy the same quantum state within a quantum system simultaneously. His suggestion became known as the exclusion principle, one of the counter stones of quantum physics.

German ace Red Baron is shot down and killed

Richthofen was shot down and killed near Vaux-sur-Somme. There has been considerable discussion and debate regarding aspects of his career, especially the circumstances of his death. He remains one of the most widely known fighter pilots of all time and has been the subject of many books, films, and other media.

Author Mark Twain dies

Mark Twain was an American writer, humorist, entrepreneur, publisher, and lecturer. Among his novels are The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and its sequel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, the latter often called "The Great American Novel". He died of a heart attack in Redding, Connecticut.

American psychologist Rollo May is born

May is best known for the existential psychologists. He was interested in reconciling existential psychology with other approaches, especially that of Sigmund Freud. He wrote many books, the most famous and influential are The Meaning of Anxiety, Man’s Search for Himself and Love and Will.

Movie pioneer Edwin S. Porter is born

Edwin Stanton Porter was an American film pioneer, most famous as a producer, director, studio manager and cinematographer with the Edison Manufacturing Company and the Famous Players Film Company. Of over 250 films created by Porter, his most important include Jack and the Beanstalk, Rescued from an Eagle's Nest, and The Prisoner of Zenda.

Bustle

American fashion designer Alexander Douglas patented the bustle. It was a framework worn under the skirt to expand the fullness or support the drapery of the back of a woman's dress. Douglas’s design had adjustments so that the size could be increased or decreased. The bustle was made from elastic material.

Novelist Charlotte Brontë is born

Charlotte Brontë was an English novelist and poet, the eldest of the three Brontë sisters who survived into adulthood and whose novels have become classics of English literature. She first published her works under the pen name Currer Bell. She was born in Market Street Thornton, west of Bradford in the West Riding of Yorkshire.

French scholastic philosopher Peter Abelard dies

Abelard was one of the most influential thinkers of the middle ages. He helped to establish the ascendancy of the philosophical authority of Aristotle. His life was eventful. He had a love affair with his student Héloïse. Abelard impregnated and married her, but her uncle arranged for a band of men to break into Abelard's room one night and castrate him.

Romulus and Remus establish Rome

The founding of Rome can be investigated through archaeology, but traditional stories handed down by the ancient Romans themselves explain the earliest history of their city in terms of legend and myth. The most familiar of these myths is the story of Romulus and Remus, the twins who were suckled by a she-wolf.

Anniversaries of the (in)famous