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Tham Luang cave rescue begins

A widely publicised cave rescue successfully extricated members of a junior football team trapped in Tham Luang Nang Non cave in Thailand. Twelve members of the team, aged eleven to sixteen, and their coach entered the cave after football practice. Shortly afterwards, heavy rains partially flooded the cave, trapping the group inside.

2017

55th NHL Entry Draft

The New Jersey Devils, Philadelphia Flyers, and Dallas Stars won the draft lotteries, giving them the first, second and third picks overall. New Jersey moved up four spots to earn the first selection, while Philadelphia and Dallas moved up from the thirteenth and eighth spots, respectively.

Jiangsu tornado

A severe thunderstorm produced a large, violent tornado over Jiangsu province, China. Striking areas along the outskirts of Yancheng around 2:30 p.m. local time, the tornado killed at least 99 people and injured 846 others. The event was declared a national-level disaster.

Brexit is approved in referendum

In Brexit referendum, 51.9% of the participating UK electorate voted to leave the European Union. The British government invoked Article 50 of the Treaty on the EU; although revoking this might be legally possible, the UK is thus on course to leave the EU in March 2019.

2013

Wallenda walks across the Grand Canyon on tightrope

Wallenda highwire walked across the Little Colorado River Gorge in Navajo territory outside Grand Canyon National Park's borders about 40 miles east of the main tourist facilities. The event billed as a "Grand Canyon crossing" and titled Skywire Live with Nik Wallenda, aired live worldwide on the Discovery Channel with a 10-second delay.

2012

Ashton Eaton breaks the decathlon world record

During qualifying meet for the 2012 Summer Olympics, Eaton started day one of the decathlon competition with two world decathlon bests, the equivalent of a world record for athletes competing in a full decathlon. The first in the 100-meter (10.21), and then in the long jump (8.23 m (27 ft 0 in)).

Marina Bay Sands officially opens

Marina Bay Sands is an integrated resort fronting Marina Bay in Singapore. At its opening, it was billed as the world's most expensive standalone casino property at S$8 billion, including the land cost. Originally set to open in 2009, Las Vegas Sands faced delays caused by escalating costs of material and labor shortages from the outset.

Chris Brown is pleaded guilty to one count of assault on Rihanna

Brown pleaded guilty to a felony and accepted a plea deal of community labor, five years of probation, and domestic violence counseling. Several organizations against domestic violence criticized the plea deal, advocating the punishment was not severe enough for the crime; the level of Brown's influence over youth also came under scrutiny.

Anno 1404 is released

Anno 1404 is a city-building and economic simulation game with real-time strategy elements, part of the Anno series. The overall concept of the storyline is based upon real-life aspects of medieval and renaissance history such as the Crusades, advancements in gothic architecture, and construction of cathedrals.

Battlefield: Bad Company is released

Bad Company is unique in the series in that it was developed for consoles and features a full single-player campaign with characters, as opposed to previous titles which were mostly released for PC and featured warfare focused on multiplayer with large numbers of players.

Final episode of "The Nanny" airs

The Nanny is an American television sitcom which originally aired on CBS from 1993 to 1999, starring Fran Drescher as Fran Fine, a Jewish fashion queen from Flushing, New York, who becomes the nanny of three children from the New York/British high society. The show was created and produced by Drescher and her husband Peter Marc Jacobson.

Super Mario 64 is released

Super Mario 64 is a platform video game developed and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo 64. It is the first Super Mario game to use three-dimensional graphics. It is the best-selling game on the Nintendo 64, with more than eleven million copies sold. In the game, Mario explores Princess Peach's castle and must rescue her from Bowser.

"Forrest Gump" premieres in Los Angeles

Forrest Gump is an American romantic drama film based on a novel of the same name by Winston Groom. The film was directed by Robert Zemeckis and stars Tom Hanks and Robin Wright. The story depicts several decades in the life of its titular character, a slow-witted but kind-hearted, good-natured and athletically prodigious man from Alabama.

1991

Mazda becomes 1st Japanese car to capture Le Mans 24 hour race

Mazda's 787B, powered with a rotary model 26B Wankel engine, won, overcoming reliability issues in the older manufacturer cars. It was the first Japanese manufacturer to win Le Mans, as well as the only non-piston engine car to ever win. It won against considerable opposition from factory-entered Mercedes, Jaguar and the new 3.5L Peugeot cars.

Sonic the Hedgehog is released

Sonic the Hedgehog is a video game franchise created and produced by Sega. Sonic, the protagonist, is an anthropomorphic blue hedgehog with supersonic speed, capable of reaching the speed of sound. Typically, Sonic, usually along with some of his friends, must stop antagonist Doctor Eggman's plans for world domination.

1990

Roger Milla dances around the corner flag

38-year-old Milla emerged as one of the tournament's major stars. He scored four goals in Italy, celebrating each one with a dance around the corner flag that has become a popular goal celebration ever since. Two of his goals came against Romania in Cameroon's second game, and two more came in extra time against Colombia.

Comic book adaptation "Batman" is released

Batman is an American superhero film directed by Tim Burton and produced by Jon Peters and Peter Guber, based on the DC Comics character of the same name. It is the first installment of Warner Bros.' initial Batman film series. The film stars Michael Keaton as Bruce Wayne/Batman and Jack Nicholson as the Joker.

The bombing of Air India 182

The Boeing 747-237B serving the flight was destroyed by a bomb at an altitude of 31,000 feet and crashed into the Atlantic Ocean while in Irish airspace. A total of 329 people were killed, including 268 Canadian citizens, 27 British citizens, and 24 Indian citizens.

David Letterman Show debuts on NBC

The David Letterman Show is a short-lived morning talk show on NBC, hosted by David Letterman. Familiar bits that became staples of Letterman's comedy on his later shows were originally introduced on this show. They include: "Small Town News", "Stupid Pet Tricks", and an ever-changing non-sequitur opening introduction.

"Living In The Material World" hits #1 on the US album chart

"Living in the Material World" is a song by English rock musician George Harrison. In the song's lyrics, Harrison contrasts the world of material concerns with his commitment to a spiritual path, and the conflict is further represented in the musical arrangement as the rock accompaniment alternates with sections of Indian sounds.

The Beatles have their 10th consecutive UK #1 single

"Paperback Writer" is a 1966 song recorded and released by the English rock band the Beatles. Written by Paul McCartney and John Lennon, the song was released as the A-side of their eleventh single. The single went to the No. 1 spot in the United States, United Kingdom, Ireland, West Germany, Australia, New Zealand and Norway.

Integrated circuit is patented

The patent was issued to Jack Kilby for his invention of “Miniaturized Electronic Circuits,” now known as integrated circuits, which he assigned to his employer, Texas Instruments. A few months after Kilby's demonstration in 1964, a significantly improved IC device was independently invented by Robert Noyce.

Oral contraceptive pill is made available in the U. S.

The Pill was already approved, but only for menstrual disorders, such as irregular periods or PMS. In May 1960, the FDA had cleared first oral contraceptive for general use. By the end of June, it was finally available. But it was very expensive. The cost was around $10 per month, which is equivalent to $80 today.

American Internet pioneer Vint Cerf is born

Cerf is often called one of the fathers of the internet. With Bob Kahn, he co-designed the internet's cornerstone, the TCP/IP protocol. Cerf also developed the first commercial e-mail service, the MCI Mail. he was instrumental in the funding and formation of ICANN. Cerf worked for Google as a vice-president as well.

Post and Gatty attempt to circumnavigate the world

Wiley Post and Harold Gatty successfully completed an eastbound circumnavigation in the Winnie Mae. Amazingly they completed the flight in 8 days. Apparently, Wiley Post enjoyed the experience so much that he flew another circumnavigation two years later, this time alone.

Sholes receives a patent for "Type-Writer"

The first row was made of ivory and the second of ebony, the rest of the framework was wooden. It was in this form that Sholes, Glidden, and Soule were granted patents for their invention. The first document to be produced on a typewriter was a contract that Sholes had written, in his capacity as the Comptroller for the city of Milwaukee.

Anniversaries of the (in)famous

born 1894

Edward VIII

born 1912

Alan Turing