logo

Video encyclopedia

Flashback calendar

Tony Hadley says he had left Spandau Ballet

Tony Hadley rose to fame in the 1980s as the lead singer of the new wave band Spandau Ballet before launching a solo career. In 2017, Hadley announced on Twitter that due to circumstances beyond his control, he was no longer a member of Spandau Ballet.

Bavarian bus crashes

Eighteen people died when their tour bus collided with a lorry and burst into flames on the A9 motorway in southern Germany. Another 30 on the bus were hurt and two of them were fighting for their lives. The bus was carrying a group of German pensioners at the time of the fire near Stammbach in northern Bavaria.

Karrada bombing

ISIS militants carried out coordinated bomb attacks in Baghdad that killed nearly 400 civilians and injured hundreds more. A few minutes after midnight local time, a suicide truck-bomb targeted the mainly Shia district of Karrada, busy with late night shoppers for Ramadan.

"Jason Bourne" premieres in Sydney

Jason Bourne is a 2016 American action spy film directed by Paul Greengrass and written by Paul Greengrass and Christopher Rouse. It is the fifth installment of the Bourne film series and a direct sequel to The Bourne Ultimatum. Matt Damon reprises his role as the main character, former CIA assassin Jason Bourne.

Giant's Causeway Visitors' Centre is opened

The new visitor center was officially opened by First Minister Peter Robinson and Deputy First Minister Martin McGuinness. Since opening, the new visitor center has garnered very mixed reviews from those visiting the Causeway for its pricing, design, contents, and placement across the causeway walk descent.

2012

Antonio Esfandiari wins a record $18.3M in poker

Antonio "The Magician" Esfandiari, a professional poker player and former professional magician, has won two World Poker Tour championships and three World Series of Poker bracelets in his career, including the "Big One for One Drop" in 2012, a $1,000,000 buy-in tournament with a cash prize over $18 million benefiting the One Drop Foundation.

Sarah Palin shocks America with resignation in Alaska

The resignation of Sarah Palin as Governor of Alaska, after 2.5 years of her 4-year term, became effective on July 26. Lieutenant Governor Sean Parnell succeeded Sarah Palin as Governor. Parnell was later elected to a full term, in November 2010.

Kylie Minogue receives an OBE

Kylie Ann Minogue is an Australian-British singer and actress. Minogue was officially invested by The Prince of Wales as an Officer of the Order of the British Empire. She was also appointed by the French government as a Chevalier of the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres for her contribution to the enrichment of French culture.

2006

Detroit Red Wings legend Steve Yzerman officially retires

Yzerman officially retired from professional hockey, finishing his career ranked as the seventh all-time leading scorer in NHL history, having scored a career-high 155 points in 1988–89, which has been bettered only by Wayne Gretzky and Mario Lemieux. Yzerman's #19 jersey was retired during a pre-game ceremony at Joe Louis Arena in Detroit.

Warcraft III: Reign of Chaos was released

Warcraft III: Reign of Chaos is a high fantasy real-time strategy video game developed and published by Blizzard Entertainment. It is the second sequel to Warcraft: Orcs & Humans, and it is the third game set in the Warcraft fictional universe. Warcraft III contains four playable races: Human, Orcs, Night Elves and Undead.

2001

Sol Campbell moves from Tottenham Hotspur to Arsenal

Several top continental clubs expressed interest in signing him, but he joined Arsenal on a free transfer. Campbell had previously stated in an interview with Spurs Monthly magazine that he would never play for Arsenal. The move was also unusual as no rumors of a move to Arsenal had been leaked or speculated upon in the media.

1994

Hagi announces himself to the world with a masterclass

Romania deserved their victory because they produced three superlative goals to a debatable penalty and a late consolation. In the second half especially Argentina was clearly fitter and less tired, but still had no answer to the class and penetration of Hagi and Dumitrescu.

"Batman" sets record of quickest $100 million

Batman is an American superhero film directed by Tim Burton and produced by Jon Peters and Peter Guber, based on the DC Comics character of the same name. It is the first installment of Warner Bros.' initial Batman film series. The film stars Michael Keaton as Bruce Wayne/Batman and Jack Nicholson as the Joker.

US warship shoots down 290 people in Iranian airliner

Iran Air Flight 655, a scheduled civilian passenger flight from Tehran to Dubai, was shot down by an SM-2MR surface-to-air missile fired from USS Vincennes, a guided missile cruiser of the United States Navy. The aircraft, an Airbus A300, was destroyed and all 290 people on board including 66 children were killed.

First transatlantic hot-air balloon crossing

British millionaire Richard Branson and Swedish aeronautical engineer Per Lindstrand became the first people to cross the Atlantic by hot-air balloon, called Virgin Atlantic Flyer. At the time, the balloon was the largest ever flown. It had 65 thousand cubic meters of capacity. Branson and Lindstrand travelled 4667 from Sugarloaf Mountain, Maine, to Scottish coast in 33 hours.

"Back to the Future" is released

Back to the Future is an American science fiction film directed by Robert Zemeckis and written by Zemeckis and Bob Gale. It stars Michael J. Fox as teenager Marty McFly, who accidentally travels back in time to 1955, where he meets his future parents and becomes his mother's romantic interest.

1982

Martina Navratilova beats Chris Evert for the first of 6 Wimbledon titles

Navratilova holds the records for most singles and doubles titles in the Open Era. Her record as No. 1 in singles between 1982 and 1986 remains the most dominant in professional tennis to date. Over five consecutive seasons, she won 428 out of 442 singles matches, averaging fewer than three losses per year to 87 wins.

Jim Morrison of the Doors is found dead in a bathtub

Jim Morrison died on at age 27. He was found by Courson in a bathtub at his apartment. The official cause of death was listed as heart failure, although no autopsy was performed, as it was not required by French law. His death was two years to the day after the death of Rolling Stones guitarist Brian Jones.

The Equals are at #1 on the UK singles chart

"Baby Come Back" was first released in 1966, a year after the band formed, but did not chart. However, after impressive sales in the rest of Europe, the song was re-issued in the UK and reached #1 in the UK Singles Chart, spending three weeks there.

Crosby, Stills and Nash play together for the first time

At a party in July 1968 at Joni Mitchell's house, Nash asked Stills and Crosby to repeat their performance of a new song by Stills, "You Don't Have To Cry", with Nash improvising a third part harmony. The vocals gelled, and the three realized that they had a very good vocal chemistry.

Algeria becomes independent after 132 years of French rule

The war against French rule concluded in 1962 when Algeria gained complete independence following the Evian agreements and the self-determination referendum. Algeria's first president was the Front de Libération Nationale leader Ahmed Ben Bella.

1962

Jackie Robinson becomes the first African American in Baseball Hall of Fame

Jack Roosevelt Robinson was an American professional baseball player who became the first African American to play in Major League Baseball in the modern era. When the Dodgers signed Robinson, they heralded the end of racial segregation in professional baseball that had relegated black players to the Negro leagues since the 1880s.

"Andy Williams Show" premieres on ABC

When the show first started, it was tailored to Williams's pop music stylings aimed for adult viewers. During its five-year run on NBC, The Andy Williams Show drew respectable ratings, although it never made the list of the top thirty programs.

Attack on Mers-el-Kebir

The Attack on Mers-el-Kébir was part of Operation Catapult. The operation was a British naval attack on French Navy ships at the base at Mers El Kébir on the coast of French Algeria. The bombardment killed 1,297 French servicemen, sank a battleship and damaged five ships, for a British loss of five aircraft shot down and two crewmen killed.

Steam locomotive Mallard sets world's speed record 203 km/h

Mallard is the holder of the world speed record for steam locomotives at 203 km/h. The record was achieved on the slight downward grade of Stoke Bank south of Grantham on the East Coast Main Line, and the highest speed was recorded at milepost 90¼, between Little Bytham and Essendine.

The first public demonstration of a television transmission in color

In 1928 the Baird Television Development Company achieved the first transatlantic television transmission. Baird's early technological successes and his role in the practical introduction of broadcast television for home entertainment have earned him a prominent place in television's history.

Idaho is admitted as the 43rd U.S. state

It officially became U.S. territory with the signing of the Oregon Treaty of 1846, but a separate Idaho Territory was not organized until 1863, instead being included for periods in Oregon Territory and Washington Territory. Idaho was eventually admitted to the Union in 1890, becoming the 43rd state.

Karl Benz drives first automobile

Karl Friedrich Benz was a German engine designer and automobile engineer. His Benz Patent Motorcar from 1885 is considered the first practical automobile. The first successful tests on public roads were carried out in the early summer of 1886.

Battle of Gettysburg ends in a major victory for the Union

The Battle of Gettysburg was fought for 3 days in July, 1863, in and around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, by Union and Confederate forces during the American Civil War. Union Maj. Gen. George Meade's Army of the Potomac defeated attacks by Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia, halting Lee's invasion of the North.

First savings bank in the U.S. opens

The first chartered savings bank in the United States was the Provident Institution for Savings in the Town of Boston. The Philadelphia Savings Fund Society began business the same year but was not incorporated until 1819.

Britain kill 360 people in the Wyoming Valley massacre

The Battle of Wyoming, also known as the Wyoming Massacre, was an encounter during the American Revolutionary War between American Patriots and Loyalists accompanied by Iroquois raiders that took place in the Wyoming Valley of Pennsylvania in 1778. More than three hundred Patriots were killed in the battle.

Québec City is founded

Explorer Samuel de Champlain founded a French settlement here in 1608, and adopted the Algonquin name. Quebec City is one of the oldest European cities in North America. The ramparts surrounding Old Quebec are the only fortified city walls remaining in the Americas north of Mexico.

Anniversaries of the (in)famous