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Shakira starts US tour

The El Dorado World Tour is the sixth world tour by Colombian singer Shakira, in support of her eleventh studio album, El Dorado. Comprising 54 shows so far, the tour will visit Europe, Asia, North America and Latin America. It is her first tour in seven years, the last being The Sun Comes Out World Tour.

"Christopher Robin" is released in the US

"Christopher Robin" is an American fantasy comedy-drama film directed by Marc Forster, from a screenplay by Alex Ross Perry and Allison Schroeder and a story by Perry. The film is inspired by A. A. Milne and E. H. Shepard's book Winnie-the-Pooh and is a live-action/CGI extension of the Disney franchise of the same name.

"The Spy Who Dumped Me" is released in the US

"The Spy Who Dumped Me" is an American action comedy film directed by Susanna Fogel and co-written by Fogel and David Iserson. The film stars Mila Kunis, Kate McKinnon, Justin Theroux, and Sam Heughan. It was released by Lionsgate.

2017

Neymar becomes the most expensive footballer in history

Neymar is a Brazilian professional footballer who plays as a forward for the French club Paris Saint-Germain and the Brazil national team. He is considered one of the best players in the world. Coming to prominence at the age of 17, Neymar made his professional debut playing for Santos where he was twice named the South American Footballer of the Year before moving to Europe to join Barcelona. In August 2017, Neymar transferred from Barcelona to Paris Saint-Germain in a move worth €222 million, making him the world's most expensive player.

Ludian earthquake

The 2014 Ludian earthquake struck Ludian County, Yunnan, China, with a moment magnitude of 6.1 on 3 August. The earthquake killed at least 617 people, injuring at least 2,400 others. As of 5 August 2014, 112 people remain missing. Over 12,000 houses collapsed and 30,000 were damaged. According to the United States Geological Survey, the earthquake occurred 29 km (18 mi) WSW of Zhaotong city at 16:03 local time (08:03 UTC).

Widespread rioting erupts in Karachi, leaving 85 dead

The 2010 Karachi riots started after the assassination of Parliament member Raza Haider, a member of the Muttahida Qaumi Movement political party. At least 10 Pashtuns were killed and more than 100 people injured. Economic losses over two days of riots were estimated to be about 17 billion Pakistani rupees.

Fallout 3: Mothership Zeta is released

Fallout 3: Mothership Zeta is the fifth and final part to the downloadable content video game, Fallout 3. It follows the main character who has been abducted by aliens after going to explore a mysterious radio transmission from the Alien Crash Site. Set on board an alien spacecraft, it is similar in scope and content to Operation: Anchorage, the first part in the series.

Morgan Freeman narrowly escapes death

Actor Morgan Freeman was injured in an automobile accident near Ruleville, Mississippi when the vehicle in which he was traveling, a 1997 Nissan Maxima, left the highway and flipped over several times. He and a female passenger, Demaris Meyer, were rescued from the vehicle using the "Jaws of Life".

Writer Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn dies

Aleksandr Isayevich Solzhenitsyn was a Russian novelist, historian, and short story writer. He was an outspoken critic of the Soviet Union and communism and helped to raise global awareness of its Gulag forced labor camp system. Solzhenitsyn died of heart failure near Moscow in 2008 at the age of 89.

The Statue of Liberty reopens

The Statue of Liberty is a colossal neoclassical sculpture on Liberty Island in New York City. Following the September 11 attacks, the statue and Liberty Island were immediately closed to the public. The island reopened at the end of 2001, while the pedestal and statue remained off-limits. The pedestal reopened in 2004, but the National Park Service announced that visitors could not safely be given access to the statue due to the difficulty of evacuation in an emergency.

Doom 3 is released

Doom 3 is a survival horror first-person shooter video game developed by id Software and published by Activision. The game was a critical and commercial success and with more than 3.5 million copies sold, it is the most successful game by developer id Software to date. Critics praised the game's graphics and presentation.

Bob Dylan returns to the Newport Folk Festival

After an absence of 37 years, Bob Dylan returned to the Newport Folk Festival in Rhode Island where he performed a two-hour show of 19 songs, wearing a false beard and a wig. Songs played included "Subterranean Homesick Blues," "Desolation Row," "Positively 4th Street," "The Wicked Messenger," "Like A Rolling Stone" and "Mr. Tambourine Man."

Anne Hathaway makes her debut in The Princess Diaries

"The Princess Diaries" is an American teen romantic comedy film directed by Garry Marshall and written by Gina Wendkos, based on Meg Cabot's 2000 novel of the same name. It stars Anne Hathaway, in her film debut, as Mia Thermopolis, a teenager who discovers that she is the heir to the throne of the fictional Kingdom of Genovia.

1999

Thierry Henry signs for Arsenal

Thierry Henry is a French professional football coach and former player. He signed to Premier League club Arsenal for £11 million and proceeded to make his name as a world-class player, becoming one of the best players of his generation. Under long-time mentor and coach, Arsène Wenger, Henry became a prolific striker and Arsenal's all-time leading scorer with 228 goals in all competitions. He won two FA Cups and two league titles at the club.

Tandy Corporation announces the TRS-80

The TRS-80 Micro Computer System is a desktop microcomputer launched and sold by Tandy Corporation through their Radio Shack stores. The TRS-80 featured a full-stroke QWERTY keyboard, the new Zilog Z80 processor, 4 KB DRAM standard memory, small size and desk footprint, standard 64-character/line video monitor, and a starting price of US$600.

New Zealand's Sky Tower opens

The Sky Tower is an observation and telecommunications tower located at the corner of Victoria and Federal Streets in the Auckland CBD, Auckland, New Zealand. It is 328 meters tall, as measured from ground level to the top of the mast, making it the tallest freestanding structure in the Southern Hemisphere and the 25th tallest tower in the world.

Los Del Rio starts a 14 week run at #1 on the US singles chart

"Macarena" is a Spanish dance song by Los del Río about a woman named Macarena. The reworked "Macarena (Bayside Boys remix)" spent 14 weeks at No. 1 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 singles chart, one of the longest runs atop the Hot 100 chart in history.

"Unforgiven" premieres in Los Angeles

Unforgiven is an American revisionist Western film produced and directed by Clint Eastwood and written by David Webb Peoples. The film portrays William Munny, an aging outlaw, and killer who takes on one more job years after he had turned to farm.

French Formula 1 driver Jules Bianchi is born

Jules Lucien André Bianchi was a French motor racing driver who drove for the Marussia F1 Team in the FIA Formula One World Championship. Bianchi had previously raced in Formula Renault 3.5, GP2 and Formula Three and was a Ferrari Driver Academy member. He entered Formula One as a practice driver in 2012 for Sahara Force India.

Def Leppard release their fourth studio album, "Hysteria"

Hysteria is the fourth studio album by English hard rock band Def Leppard, released through Mercury Records. It is Def Leppard's best-selling album to date, selling over 25 million copies worldwide, including 12 million in the US, and spawning seven hit singles.

"Drive" by The Cars is re-released

"Drive" is a song by The Cars, the third single from the band's Heartbeat City album and their biggest international hit. The song is associated with the 1985 Live Aid, where it was performed by Benjamin Orr during the Philadelphia event; previously, the song was used as the background music to a montage of clips depicting the Ethiopian famine.

Actress Carolyn Jones dies of cancer

Carolyn Sue Jones was an American actress of television and film. Jones was diagnosed with colon cancer in 1981 but continued to work while telling colleagues she was being treated for ulcers. After a period of apparent remission, cancer returned. In 1983, she fell into a coma at her home in California, where she eventually died.

"Little Night Music" closes after 601 performances

A Little Night Music opened on Broadway at the Shubert Theatre in 1973. It was directed by Harold Prince with choreography by Patricia Birch and design by Boris Aronson. Performances were held in the venue until they were moved to the Majestic Theatre where, after 601 performances and 12 previews, the play closed in 1974.

McCartney's band Wings is formed

Wings were a rock band formed by former Beatle Paul McCartney with his wife Linda on keyboards, session drummer Denny Seiwell, and former Moody Blues guitarist Denny Laine. Wings were noted for frequent personnel changes as well as commercial success, going through three lead guitarists and four drummers.

Musician James Hetfield is born

James Alan Hetfield is an American musician, singer, and songwriter known for being the co-founder, lead vocalist, rhythm guitarist, and main songwriter for the American heavy metal band Metallica. Hetfield is mainly known for his intricate rhythm playing, but occasionally performs lead guitar duties and solos, both live and in the studio.

The Beatles play their last ever performance at The Cavern Club

A month after recording "She Loves You", the Beatles performed at the club for the last time. McFall ran the club until 1965, before closing it due to bankruptcy. The fans of the club were incensed at the closure and barricaded themselves inside. The club changed hands several more times before eventually being demolished.

USS Nautilus travels beneath the Arctic ice cap

USS Nautilus was the world's first operational nuclear-powered submarine and the first submarine to complete a submerged transit of the North Pole. The trip beneath the ice cap was an important boost to America as the Soviets had recently launched Sputnik, but had no nuclear submarine of their own.

Novelist Colette dies

Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette was a French novelist nominated for the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1948. Her best known work, the novella Gigi, was the basis for a film and a Lerner and Loewe stage production of the same name. On her death, she was refused a religious funeral by the Catholic Church on account of her divorces, but was given a state funeral, the first French woman of letters to be granted such an honor.

1949

BAA adopts the name National Basketball Association

The league adopted the name National Basketball Association after merging with the competing National Basketball League. The league's several international as well as individual team offices are directed out of its head offices located in the Olympic Tower at 645 Fifth Avenue in New York, NY. NBA.

The world's first themed amusement park opens

Holiday World & Splashin' Safari is a combination theme park and water park located near Interstate 64 and U.S. 231 in Santa Claus, Indiana, United States. The theme park is divided into four sections that celebrate Christmas, Halloween, Thanksgiving and the Fourth of July with rides, live entertainment, games, and attractions.

Business magnate Martha Stewart is born

Martha Helen Stewart is an American businesswoman, writer, and television personality. As founder of Martha Stewart Living Omnimedia, she has gained success through a variety of business ventures, encompassing publishing, broadcasting, merchandising, and e-commerce.

1936

Jesse Owens wins the 100 metre dash at the Berlin Olympics

Jesse Owens won the 100 m dash with a time of 10.3 s, defeating teammate and college friend Ralph Metcalfe by a tenth of a second and defeating Tinus Osendarp of the Netherlands by two-tenths of a second.

Singer Tony Bennett is born

Tony Bennett is an American singer of traditional pop standards, big band, show tunes, and jazz. He is also a painter and has created works under the name Anthony Benedetto that are on permanent public display in several institutions. He is the founder of the Frank Sinatra School of the Arts in Astoria, Queens, New York.

Writer Joseph Conrad dies

Joseph Conrad was a Polish-British writer regarded as one of the greatest novelists to write in the English language. Though he did not speak English fluently until his twenties, he was a master prose stylist who brought a non-English sensibility into English literature. His stories and novels often depict trials of the human spirit in the midst of what he saw as an impassive, inscrutable universe. Conrad died at his house in Kent, England, probably of a heart attack, and was interred at Canterbury Cemetery.

Germany declares war on France

France began full mobilization on 1 August and, two days later, Germany declared war on France. The border between France and Germany was heavily fortified on both sides so, according to the Schlieffen Plan, Germany then invaded neutral Belgium and Luxembourg before moving towards France from the north.

First crop dusting in history takes place in Dayton, Ohio

The experiment was conducted on the grounds of the Corps's research station at McCook Field. The plane was a United States Army Air Service Curtiss JN4 (“Jenny”) biplane, spreading lead arsenate to kill catalpa sphinx caterpillars. It was piloted by John A. Macready. The first test was considered highly successful.

US merchant SS Ancon becomes the first ship to sail through Panama Canal

Work on the project was started by France in 1881. It was finished by the United States thirty-three years later. Today it is controlled by the Republic of Panama. The canal has eighty kilometers and three locks. The passage takes around eleven and half hour. In 1914, the traffic was 1 000 ships. Today, it is around 850 000 vessels a year.

The Firestone Tire and Rubber Company is founded

The Firestone Tire and Rubber Company is an American tire company founded by Harvey Firestone in 1900 to supply pneumatic tires for wagons, buggies, and other forms of wheeled transportation common in the era. Firestone soon saw the huge potential for marketing tires for automobiles, and the company was a pioneer in the mass production of tires.

1852

The first Harvard-Yale Regatta is held

The Harvard-Yale Regatta is an annual rowing race between the men's heavyweight rowing crews of Harvard University and Yale University. First contested in 1852, it has been held annually since 1859 except during major wars fought by the United States. The Race is America's oldest collegiate athletic competition, pre-dating The Game by 23 years.

Rossini's "William Tell" opens in Paris

Guillaume Tell is a French-language opera in four acts by Italian composer Gioachino Rossini to a libretto by Victor-Joseph Étienne de Jouy and L. F. Bis, based on Friedrich Schiller's play William Tell which drew on the William Tell legend. The opera was Rossini's last, although he lived for nearly 40 more years.

American inventor Elisha Otis is born

He invented the elevator brake, which prevents elevators from falling if the hoisting cable fails. Before this invention, elevators of his time were dangerous to use. The brake made massive expansion of elevators possible. Thanks to Elisha Otis, we can build high buildings with many floors. Otis founded an elevator company which still exists today.

Teatro alla Scala opens in Milan

Teatro alla Scala is a renowned Italian opera house. Inaugurated in 1778, it was originally known as the Nuovo Regio Ducale Teatro alla Scala. Most of Italy's greatest operatic artists, and many of the finest singers from around the world, have appeared at La Scala. The theatre is regarded as one of the leading opera and ballet venues in the world and is home to the La Scala Theatre Chorus, La Scala Theatre Ballet and La Scala Theatre Orchestra.

Columbus embarks on his first transatlantic voyage

Columbus was an explorer and colonist with Italian origins whose voyages were sponsored by the Spanish Crown of Castile. He set out on his first expedition from Palos de la Frontera with a carrack called the Santa Maria and two smaller caravels. During this voyage, they discovered the Bahamas, inhabited by the peaceful Lucayan, Taíno and Arawak tribes.

Anniversaries of famous

died 1966

Lenny Bruce

born 1994

Todd Gurley

died 1954

Colette

born 1999

Brahim Díaz