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Venezuela earthquakes

In 2018, a magnitude 7.3 earthquake struck just off the northern coast of Venezuela, near Cariaco, Sucre. It prompted evacuations in Caracas, and caused shaking in Colombia, Guyana, Brazil, Dominica, Barbados, St. Lucia, and Trinidad and Tobago, the last of which also suffered damage and brief phone and power outages from about 100 miles away.

Reality show "Cops" celebrates its 1000th episode

Cops celebrated its 1,000th episode with a live special on Spike called Cops: Beyond the Bust, hosted by Terry Crews, which included historical clips from the run of the series as well as reunions of officers and the suspects that they arrested. The date of the 1,000th episode also marked a shift from Saturday to Monday airing.

Thalys train attack

On 21 August 2015, a man opened fire on a Thalys train on its way from Amsterdam to Paris before his assault rifle jammed, and he was subdued by passengers. Four people were injured, including the assailant. French police believe the incident to be an Islamist terrorist attack, although the attorney for the accused said that robbery was his only intent. French, American, and British passengers confronted the attacker; they received France's highest decoration, the Legion of Honour, and some received other honours, as well.

FXX breaks TV marathon record

FXX is an American digital cable and satellite television channel owned by 21st Century Fox. The channel is best known for setting the record for the longest continuous marathon in the history of television, which featured every single episode of The Simpsons that had already been released at the time, which numbered over 550.

Corn price hits all-time high of $849 after dry summer

Corn and soybean prices surged to fresh record highs as concerns heightened over a shortage of crops amid the worst US drought in half a century. The sharp increase in grains prices came as a devastating drought has downgraded prospects for corn and other grains as well as soybeans in the US.

Tarantino’s "Inglorious Basterds" is released

Inglourious Basterds is a 2009 war film written and directed by Quentin Tarantino. The film tells the alternate history story of two plots to assassinate Nazi Germany's leadership, one planned by Shosanna Dreyfus, a young French Jewish cinema proprietor, and the other by a team of Jewish American soldiers led by First Lieutenant Aldo Raine.

BioShock is released

BioShock is a first-person shooter video game developed by 2K Boston and 2K Australia and published by 2K Games. BioShock received critical acclaim and was particularly praised by critics for its morality-based storyline, immersive environments, and its unique setting, and is considered to be one of the greatest video games of all time.

Final episode of "Six Feet Under" airs

Six Feet Under is an American drama television series created and produced by Alan Ball. It premiered on the premium cable network HBO in the United States in 2001, and ended in 2005, spanning five seasons and 63 episodes. It depicts the lives of the Fisher family, who run a funeral home in Los Angeles, and their friends and lovers.

"Be Here Now" becomes one of the fastest selling albums ever

On the first day of release, Be Here Now sold over 424,000 copies, becoming the fastest-selling album in British chart history, while initial reviews were overwhelmingly positive. The album's producer Owen Morris said the recording sessions were marred by arguments and drug abuse, and that the band's only motivations were commercial.

"Barton Fink" is released in the US

Barton Fink is an American period film written, produced, directed and edited by the Coen brothers. It stars John Turturro in the title role as a young New York City playwright who is hired to write scripts for a film studio in Hollywood, and John Goodman as Charlie, the insurance salesman who lives next door at the run-down Hotel Earle.

"Gang of Eight" coup in Russia collapses

The 1991 Soviet coup d'état attempt was an attempt by members of the government of the USSR to take control of the country from Soviet President and General Secretary Mikhail Gorbachev. The coup leaders were hard-line members of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union.

Surprising smash hit "Dirty Dancing" premieres

Dirty Dancing is an American romantic drama dance film written by Eleanor Bergstein, directed by Emile Ardolino and starring Patrick Swayze and Jennifer Grey in the lead roles, and featuring Cynthia Rhodes and Jerry Orbach. Originally a low-budget film by a new studio, Vestron Pictures, Dirty Dancing became a box office hit.

Gas cloud kills Cameroon villagers

A limnic eruption at Lake Nyos in northwestern Cameroon killed 1,746 people. The eruption triggered the sudden release of about 100,000–300,000 tons of CO2. The gas cloud rose at nearly 100 kilometers per hour and then descended onto nearby villages, displacing all the air and suffocating people and livestock within 25 kilometers of the lake.

Filipino opposition leader Benigno Aquino shot dead

Aquino was assassinated in 1983, when he was shot in the head after returning to the country. At the time, bodyguards were assigned to him by the Marcos government. A subsequent investigation produced controversy but with no definitive results. After Marcos' government was overthrown, another investigation found sixteen defendants guilty.

"La Cage aux Folles" opens on Broadway

La Cage aux Folles is a musical with a book by Harvey Fierstein and lyrics and music by Jerry Herman. Based on the 1973 French play of the same name by Jean Poiret, it focuses on a gay couple. The original 1983 Broadway production received nine nominations for Tony Awards and won six, including Best Musical, Best Score, and Best Book.

Bono of U2 marries his highschool love Alison Stewart

Bono is an Irish singer-songwriter, musician, venture capitalist, businessman, and philanthropist. He is married to activist and businesswoman Alison Hewson. The couple has four children: daughters Jordan and Memphis Eve, and sons Elijah Bob Patricius Guggi Q and John Abraham.

The first Gap store opens in San Francisco

Don opened the first Gap store on Ocean Avenue in San Francisco on August 21, 1969; its only merchandise consisted of Levi's and LP records to attract teen customers. By 1973, the company had over 25 locations and had expanded into the East Coast market with a store in the Echelon Mall in Voorhees, New Jersey.

Warshaw Pact invasion of Czechoslovakia

The Warsaw Pact invasion of Czechoslovakia was a joint invasion of Czechoslovakia by five Warsaw Pact nations – the Soviet Union, Bulgaria, Hungary, East Germany and Poland. Approximately 250,000 Warsaw pact troops attacked Czechoslovakia that night, with Romania and Albania refusing to participate.

Gemini 5 is launched

The mission broke the previous Soviet record for spaceflight duration. It was possible because of the new fuel cells that generated enough electricity. These cells were a pivotal innovation for future Apollo flights. Astronauts Gordon Cooper and Pete Conrad also practiced a space rendezvous with "pod" deployed from the spacecraft.

Marvelettes release "Please Mr. Postman"

The Marvelettes recording features lead singer Gladys Horton hoping that the postman has brought her a letter from her boyfriend, who is away at war. The accompaniment is provided by the Funk Brothers, including Marvin Gaye on drums. The Marvelettes' version later appeared in a bar fight scene in the film Mean Streets, directed by Martin Scorsese.

Patsy Cline records "Crazy"

Patsy Cline was already a country music superstar and looking for material to extend a string of hits. She picked it as a follow-up to her previous big hit "I Fall to Pieces". "Crazy", its complex melody suiting Cline's vocal talent perfectly, was released in late 1961, and immediately became another huge hit for Cline.

The Mona Lisa is stolen by a Louvre employee

Louvre employee Vincenzo Peruggia had stolen the Mona Lisa by entering the building during regular hours, hiding in a broom closet, and walking out with it hidden under his coat after the museum had closed. The theft was not discovered until the next day.

Oldsmobile, an American car brand, is founded

Oldsmobile was a brand of American automobiles produced for most of its existence by General Motors. Olds Motor Vehicle Co. was founded by Ransom E. Olds in 1897. It produced over 35 million vehicles, including at least 14 million built at its Lansing, Michigan factory.

William Seward Burroughs invents mechanical calculator

Burroughs developed his adding machine to ease the monotony of clerical work. One year after making his first patent application Burroughs incorporated his business. Adding machines such as his were ubiquitous office equipment until they were phased out in favour of electronic calculators and later personal computers.

James Cook claims eastern Australia for Great Britain

Having rounded the Cape, Cook landed on Possession Island, where he claimed the entire coastline he had just explored for the British Crown. In negotiating the Torres Strait past Cape York, Cook also put an end to the speculation that New Holland and New Guinea were part of the same land mass.

Anniversaries of the (in)famous